In a slight quandry

ARRIVALS

Well-Known Member
I think it's clear they were only every interested in your companies clients. Not a merger to form new relationships, create a new design base etc.. etc..
 
Right. We had the meeting today and they have refused to accept to take us on board as employees (the company is trading at a lose) and if we didn't resign the deal would be off. This is my boss's last life line.
 
I think it's clear they were only every interested in your companies clients. Not a merger to form new relationships, create a new design base etc.. etc..

I don't think this is the case, they said they wanted to create a group with teams of specialists. They want to "wind down" one of their companies and rename it.
 

Moominbaby

Member
I think it's a shame that you are in this situation but if I was you there is no way on earth that I would just roll over and give up. Having spent 6mths solidly looking for a job I know how hard it is to get one at the moment.
There is nice and then there is being a push over. I guess people always do what theyre going to do but if you end up just handing in you resignation then is not the new companies fault but yours. I don't mean to sound unsympathetic you need to think about youself in the situation.
 

ARRIVALS

Well-Known Member
Right. We had the meeting today and they have refused to accept to take us on board as employees (the company is trading at a lose) and if we didn't resign the deal would be off. This is my boss's last life line.

They have refused to take you on as employees, because they want to keep their own designers and their own freelancers, as well as the clients of the new company they're taking over. Hence why they're making you resign, take redundancy or if those 2 things don't happen, pull out of the deal altogether.

If you're trading at a loss, what is there for them to want to take over? The clients. They obviously feel as a bigger company, they can put right what is currently going wrong for you.

I wouldn't even think about your boss at this point. It's your job and livelihood as well as his.
 
Thanks Arrivals :)

Can anyone advise me on what they think this sentence may mean "I confirm that we have no further or outstanding claim upon ------ Limited." We were told to include this is our resignation notice. I've ask around several people and they suggest it could mean that I will waiver all my rights.
 

ARRIVALS

Well-Known Member
"I confirm that we have no further or outstanding claim upon ------ Limited." We were told to include this is our resignation notice. I've ask around several people and they suggest it could mean that I will waiver all my rights.

Sounds EXACTLY like that to me. It means you have taken the decision to resign from your job voluntarily, you don't require any financial compensation and will have nothing to do with the company from this point on.

I'd tell them to stick it.
 
Do you think they would only accept my resignation if I only included this sentence? I would need a resignation to be able for me to apply to other jobs. How would I get my P45?
 

ARRIVALS

Well-Known Member
If they fired you, you'd easily win an unfair dismissal case, so would either get your job back, or financial compensation. In which case it wouldn't go on your CV.

I'd imagine they wouldn't accept the resignation if the letter did not contain that line, simply because you could resign, then claim you were made to resign (like you actually are) and then they'd be ballsed again. They're basically covering their backs.

I'd refuse to resign.
 

Dave L

Well-Known Member
If you don't resign and they don't either make your post redundant or otherwise (unfairly) dismiss you then you don't need a P45 as you still have a job.

Have you taken proper advice? Do that, and then play hardball.
 

ARRIVALS

Well-Known Member
Not a lot really. In fact, I can't actually think of any differences. Freelancer is just a fancy name for sub-contractor I'd say.

Either way you're not on their payroll getting a monthly wage, and you're working on a freelance basis per hour or per job.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong.
 

Dave L

Well-Known Member
Does anyone know the difference between Freelancer and Sub-Contractor?

They're basically the same person but whereas your status as a freelancer is universal, sub-contracting arrangements relate to a specific company (i.e. the one with whom you're engaged as a sub-contractor).
 
Quick update. Am now taking legal action and have an appointment on Monday. Fucking scared now and am now having the shakes :(
 

ARRIVALS

Well-Known Member
Chill out.

They can't make you resign, and they can't fire you for no reason at all. If they make you redundant, you'll get a payout. You're in a better position than they are and remember, you're not the only designer there.
 
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