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Crease / Trim lines (output)

Discussion in 'Printing & Print Design Forum:' started by spottypenguin, Mar 17, 2012.

  1. spottypenguin

    spottypenguin Active Member

    Hello everyone. I have a menu/leaflet to do for someone which is essentially an A3 folded but he is wanting the front panel narrower so a "tab" shows from behind. Am I better to set up as A3 and drop in an overprint line where I want the trim on the front or set up the document to the smaller size and put an overprint line for the fold? Thanking you
     
  2. Stationery Direct

    Stationery Direct Administrator Staff Member

    The exact flat dimensions with bleed showing the positions for the folds.
     
  3. spottypenguin

    spottypenguin Active Member

    Thanks muchly Boss Man, this will be with the guy's printer I haven't used before, is it industry norm / ok to use a one point stroke set as Overprint?

    Cheers muchly
     
  4. Katedesign

    Katedesign Well-Known Member

    Fold line are normally shown as dotted lines... ------------ and shouldn't need to be as overprint (ie another spot colour). The danger here is, if you do digital and litho, on digital the overprint line will also be printed!
     
  5. RichyLad

    RichyLad New Member

    For Katedesign, fold lines and cut lines will both print on digital and litho devices. The critical thing is that they are set as a spot colour and overprint in both cases for both, when printing with process colour. And with spots and/or process colours that they are in a colour not being used in the job, but allways a spot colour.
     
  6. Katedesign

    Katedesign Well-Known Member

    For Richylad - if the cut lines and fold marks are outside the print area, in the bleed area - as they should be - then it is much easier to trim and fold than having them as an overprint. The only 'overprint' guides should be for die cutting/kiss cutting when a forme is made-up.
     
  7. RichyLad

    RichyLad New Member

    Personally I would always set cut and crease marks to spot colour not used in job and set to overprint and identify them with appropriate names in the colour palette, and in a title box for packaging. If the printer at the end of the day wants to make his own marks on his imposition then so be it. But the best way to set them up from a designers point of view is as I said leaving no doubt as to where these items are, so that your backside is covered when the job goes to press. Unfortunately you need to think of what can go wrong and how you would stand up in court and win with the information you provided them with. Usually in packaging design the creases and cuts are displayed in two different spot colours (not colours in the job) to identify them and very often safe glue and varnish safe areas - and the varnish areas too. Trim and fold marks if used without drawing a die line should never be in the bleed area, this is bleed and needs to be free from anything but the bleeding image (excuse pun) - the last thing you want is these marks encroaching on the finished printed item.
     

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