Adobe essentially forcing updates.


Paul Murray

Moderator
Staff member
One of the main things with the Affinity Publisher for me was the ability to open a PDF in the software, and straightaway you could start editing it.
An annoying bug I've found is that you currently can't copy elements from Publisher into Designer. Well you can, but they'll be scattered all over the place. You need to open the PDF in Affinity to grab the elements from that. Kind of a nuisance for me.
 

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
Well I would but they won't even let me scroll the page without turning off my adblocker... ok works if I disable javascript blocking.... seriously though who needs javascript just to scroll a damn web page
Glad it's not just me then. :D
 

AysheaS

Member
I think its rude to call me naïve, Levi, just because I don’t share your opinion on Adobe’s marketing strategy.

I don’t believe Adobe are trying to stop all pirates (the cost for that would await the benefit), but £16 a month for a student license is enough to tempt them to pay. Adobe may not be hunting down every single person that uses a pirated copy, but I don’t believe they want to make it too appealing to download a cracked copy either*.

The downside of a subscription, which is why this thread was started, is that Adobe can take away software and force upgrades. You no longer have a perpetual license. And I said in a previously the big reason for the change to subscription is Adobe want to keep people paying them, there is no option for a one-off fee. But I don’t believe Adobe doesn’t give two hoots about people copying their software and that wasn’t part of the consideration to move to subscription based. After all they want people, as many people as possible, to pay for their software including future designers. And that is what that achieved, both students and pros paying - as I said years ago none of us bought design software (too expensive), now many students are paying for a subscription. So by making it affordable students are less likely to download a dodgy copy and more likely to purchase a monthly subscription. In the end it all boils down to money, Adobe want to make as much as possible but that’s how businesses operate.

Personally I’m tempted by Affinity Designer, the small one-off fee compared to Adobe’s monthly is a big reason. No worry about needing to keep paying just so I can open my files. Plus, I only make illustrations for myself, I’m not a pro so cross-compatibility with other designers isn’t an issue. I’d like to see Affinity become stiff competition to Adobe – companies have no need to change when they have a monopoly.


*Yes, I know it exists and where to get that – I’m not as naïve as you think. I also know said software tends to be buggy and contains malicious code.
 

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
Personally I’m tempted by Affinity Designer, the small one-off fee compared to Adobe’s monthly is a big reason. No worry about needing to keep paying just so I can open my files. Plus, I only make illustrations for myself, I’m not a pro so cross-compatibility with other designers isn’t an issue. I’d like to see Affinity become stiff competition to Adobe – companies have no need to change when they have a monopoly.
I'm with you there.

I'm just waiting until the new beta is integrated and then I'm off to Serif and adios to Adobe.
I went onto the Serif website forum to ask a few questions and do you know something...the people from Serif answered as they are like real people who actually take on board what people say and want.
Plus, they're a UK company located in Nottingham.

Everything I've heard about Affinity has been positive.
 

Levi

Moderator
Staff member
I think its rude to call me naïve, Levi, just because I don’t share your opinion on Adobe’s marketing strategy.

I don’t believe Adobe are trying to stop all pirates (the cost for that would await the benefit), but £16 a month for a student license is enough to tempt them to pay. Adobe may not be hunting down every single person that uses a pirated copy, but I don’t believe they want to make it too appealing to download a cracked copy either*.

The downside of a subscription, which is why this thread was started, is that Adobe can take away software and force upgrades. You no longer have a perpetual license. And I said in a previously the big reason for the change to subscription is Adobe want to keep people paying them, there is no option for a one-off fee. But I don’t believe Adobe doesn’t give two hoots about people copying their software and that wasn’t part of the consideration to move to subscription based. After all they want people, as many people as possible, to pay for their software including future designers. And that is what that achieved, both students and pros paying - as I said years ago none of us bought design software (too expensive), now many students are paying for a subscription. So by making it affordable students are less likely to download a dodgy copy and more likely to purchase a monthly subscription. In the end it all boils down to money, Adobe want to make as much as possible but that’s how businesses operate.

Personally I’m tempted by Affinity Designer, the small one-off fee compared to Adobe’s monthly is a big reason. No worry about needing to keep paying just so I can open my files. Plus, I only make illustrations for myself, I’m not a pro so cross-compatibility with other designers isn’t an issue. I’d like to see Affinity become stiff competition to Adobe – companies have no need to change when they have a monopoly.


*Yes, I know it exists and where to get that – I’m not as naïve as you think. I also know said software tends to be buggy and contains malicious code.
Read my posts... I did not call YOU naive, I said your viewpoint was naive, there's a difference.
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
It's like having a TV license. You pay for that every year, with a one-off payment, or you can pay per month. (At least in Ireland you can).

The TV license allows you to watch the most up to date news, the most up to date shows, it shows you the latest advertisements, and it keeps you up to date with current affairs, entertainment, music, anything you want to be kept up-to-date on is available on the TV.

Much like Adobe's license, if you want to stay up-to-date then you pay for the license to use the software.

If you don't want to watch TV, or have a different setup, like having a Smart Monitor that doesn't have a port for TV - or through a laptop/tablet/phone - then you can opt to receive your former TV service through these other channels.

Adobe are the leading makers in software for graphic design (most iterations of it) - and it makes sense that they want to keep the revenue streams coming in monthly/yearly payments.

Previously, and I know because I spoke with Michael Ninness (Adobe head guy), people would get say Adobe CS2 - then CS3 would be released, and people skipped that and waited for CS4.

But those on CS upgraded to CS3, and CS2 were upgrading to CS4, CS3 then upgraded to CS5, and CS4 would upgrade to CS6 and so on.

This led to many people not upgrading either, and continued to work on CS to CS6 inclusively.

Which meant they had to keep updating all the way back as far as CS - which was a pain.
Plus CS stopped working with later versions of OS - no fault of Adobe, but there were so few people using it they discontinued it, hoping to push people towards the newer versions, more stability, more features and better overall for them.

This happened for CS through to Creative Cloud and understandably a pain for Adobe to keep all versions up to date - especially when the people still running CS to CS6 (inclusively) never rebought a subscription or upgraded at all - they are essentially getting free updates to keep their version running smoothly.

Then came along Creative Cloud - the nasty monster - and most people were disgusted at a cloud-based system, the same people who probably pirated the software in the past, the same people who bought CS3 and never upgraded to CS6, yet they demanded that their version of CS3 which they bought 6 years ago run smoothly on Windows 10 - how dare Adobe!

Creative Cloud was born - it offers a portal to streamline updates - you used to be able to install many iterations of the software - but Adobe has reached saturation point in regards to updating all iterations across all OS.

It it possible that it's better for everyone to be working on the same versions or at most 1 version behind?

Maybe there's an overall reason for this that hasn't been made public, maybe they have a big announcement in regards to how all the applications interact, and this is the first step in ensuring we're all on the same page for when they roll out something like this.


I'm pretty sure, even with Affinity, or any other software, like MS Office, you don't have MS Office 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016 installed on your computer.

And I'm pretty sure if you have the likes of MS Office 2012 on your computer that MS don't support it and require you to upgrade to get support.

And I'm pretty sure you won't have multiple versions of Affinity on your computer either.


Actually, Adobe is the only software where I have multiple versions of software installed.

Is their subscription model flawed? Possibly - but it is working for them, which I do know.

And there are alternatives if you don't want to use Adobe.
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
You guys don't pay a TV license?

Ok, it's like car tax, or insurance, etc. Whatever else you can think of to substitute tv's.

:unsure:
 

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
You guys don't pay a TV license?
Nope. Haven't for ages now.

Worked out that we didn't really watch or record live TV and didn't watch any BBC at all,
We all watch Netflix, Catch-up and box sets.

It's more out of principal as I wouldn't pay a shopping tax to Sainsbury's when I shop at Tesco.
 

Paul Murray

Moderator
Staff member
Same, I'm not required to since I don't watch live TV. My aerial isn't even plugged in! If you don't pay and don't tell them you're not they send you very aggressive looking letters demanding you pay. They're designed to look intimidating, like you might actually be in trouble, presumably so people pay when they don't need to.

So as not to be off topic, I'll offer my opinion. AdobeCC as a concept is actually pretty good. You get good deal for £50 a month. That essentially gives you all their tools to use commercially for a pretty fair price. Over the year it also works out about the same as the old cost. If you're working professionally as a business and you can't cover the cost of CC each month, then there's something seriously wrong with your business strategy.

However, like many I'm not a fan of being locked into the monthly subscription model, mainly because I have so many other programs I use that also have perpetual licensing that the cost can really add up over time. But there's not really anything we can do, SaaS is clearly working for Adobe and many others so we'll have to just suck it up and live with it. The main issue I have with Adobe software is stability (they crash a lot) and the overall interface/user experience, which it would still have even if it wasn't cloud-based.

It sucks that they're forcing everyone to update, but that's what you agree to when you sign up and use it. The only think you can do really is vote with your wallet and not use it, or grin and bare it.

If they went back the old 'pay upfront' model, well I'd probably be 2 or 3 releases behind like I used to be because I didn't have/want to fork out £600 each year. So really, if I think about it, I'm actually benefiting from CC. :whistle:
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
The way it is here, if your TV has an aerial port, even not in working order (it's deemed repairable), that you have to pay a TV license.

You could have an old tv that's 20 years old and hasn't worked in 10 years, but as long as it has an aerial port, it's deemed repariable, so you have to pay the license.

They pretty much have it sown up here.

The only way around it is with Smart Monitors, etc. that can't receive a terrestrial signal.
 

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
The way it is here, if your TV has an aerial port, even not in working order (it's deemed repairable), that you have to pay a TV license.

You could have an old tv that's 20 years old and hasn't worked in 10 years, but as long as it has an aerial port, it's deemed repariable, so you have to pay the license.

They pretty much have it sown up here.

The only way around it is with Smart Monitors, etc. that can't receive a terrestrial signal.
JEEZUS!

But you're in the Republic of Ireland? That's just archaic.
I just had to opt out and tell them I didn't use or need their "service" via a form.

Might be tempting fate but we've never heard a dickie bird from them.

Even if they do send a 'rent a goon' around you don't have to let them in or even speak to them.
You can even remover their "implied right of access" so they can't even set a foot on your property.
Wouldn't matter if they did check our equipment as we just don't watch or record live TV as it's all on catch-up when we want to watch something.
 
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