In House Designer for NHS

Hi guys!

It's been a while.

I've recently applied for an in house Graphic Design job for the NHS Ambulence service. I just wondered if anyone had ever had a design job with in the NHS, or an organisation similar, that could give me an idea of what to expect?
And what sort of things are they likely to ask during an interview?

Basically any info, advice and/or tips that would be useful.

Much appreciated :)
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
One of the critical things will be attention to detail and working within strict guidelines and system sets.
Knowledge of advanced checking systems and tools or the ability to learn to new systems will be required. Things like using systems similar to TVT, Global Vision, Artproof, Proofhub or other systems.

Don't worry they're quite easy to use but a demonstration of how you can learn from a real-life example of new software and adhere to guidelines.

Most importantly, working in anything medical, it's strict, it's about people's lives, and design decisions and mistakes can actually cost lives at most and at least cause the NHS to be sued for misinformation.

Think of a situation if a leaflet or other item was sent to all households and said "If you are experiencing symptoms do not not contact a doctor"

Or if a translation was incomplete or incorrect.

It's paramount to be sensitive during the interview that you are aware that it's vital to be vigilant about the effect it will have on people who will be viewing the documents you design.

Most importantly if anything contains things about the quantity of medication to take, and say it's 254ml - and you accidentally set the 5 to a none fill or worse, it's white set to overprint on a black background. That wouldn't print it would read '2 4ml'


Make no mistake - it's a serious job.

Hope that helps
 
One of the critical things will be attention to detail and working within strict guidelines and system sets.
Knowledge of advanced checking systems and tools or the ability to learn to new systems will be required. Things like using systems similar to TVT, Global Vision, Artproof, Proofhub or other systems.

Don't worry they're quite easy to use but a demonstration of how you can learn from a real-life example of new software and adhere to guidelines.

Most importantly, working in anything medical, it's strict, it's about people's lives, and design decisions and mistakes can actually cost lives at most and at least cause the NHS to be sued for misinformation.

Think of a situation if a leaflet or other item was sent to all households and said "If you are experiencing symptoms do not not contact a doctor"

Or if a translation was incomplete or incorrect.

It's paramount to be sensitive during the interview that you are aware that it's vital to be vigilant about the effect it will have on people who will be viewing the documents you design.

Most importantly if anything contains things about the quantity of medication to take, and say it's 254ml - and you accidentally set the 5 to a none fill or worse, it's white set to overprint on a black background. That wouldn't print it would read '2 4ml'


Make no mistake - it's a serious job.

Hope that helps
Some really good tips there, thank you!
I can imagine it's a very serious job, but it would certainly be rewarding and stimulating; which is what I'm after!

Thanks again..
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
100% is fulfilling and you know you're actually doing worthwhile work.

It can be boring. It can be stimulating. It can be slow, it can be fast.

But it makes a difference.
 
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