CV Help?!

Hey guys,

Just wanting a bit of advice about making a design CV.

I don't have any previous Design work experience (as I mentioned before, I only recently left Uni); so how do I make my CV relevant and something that will interest future design employers?

I've only ever worked in retail/customer service, so the only real work experience asset I have at the moment, is being confident in dealing with people and a good understanding of customer/client care.

Someone mentioned designing a CV as if it were a piece of work, to make it stand out more, would that be a good idea? Or does it come off as a bit 'showy-offy'?

Sorry to ramble on,

Thanks in advance! :)
 

fisicx

Active Member
Depends on who will be reading it.

I’d keep it simple and use the CV to introduce yourself and add images as a portfolio.

I wouldn’t try to mix the two. But that’s just my opinion, others may think differently.
 
Depends on who will be reading it.

I’d keep it simple and use the CV to introduce yourself and add images as a portfolio.

I wouldn’t try to mix the two. But that’s just my opinion, others may think differently.

I'm on the fence about it, to be honest. I suppose a CV is the paper equivalent of a first impression. While I don't want it to be a boring, old word document, I don't want to come across as show off either.
 

Jri

Member
It's a tricky one as the other side of the coin is that any glaring issues in your presentation of a document (CV or otherwise) could potentially hurt your chances.

I usually go for a relatively simple PDF in a nice legible font. Neatly laid out with a few minimal motifs (like hairlines to divide up different areas of text, well chosen text weight/sizing to denote headers etc...) - but I avoid any Marvel movie level special effects to make sure it doesn't look like I'm trying too hard.

I also try to make sure that the style of the text/labeling in my portfolio/website is consistent with the text on my CV so it looks 'on brand' for lack of a better word.

The philosophy of treating it like a piece of work is still valid, but if you think about it - if a client came to you wanting you to design a formal document they'd probably not want a dull word document or an excessively flashy piece of work either.
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
The old CV dilemma!

Years ago, I felt my portfolio was glitzy enough that I decided as an experiment to do a plain black and white straightforward Word version of my CV.
I got call backs but everyone was shocked that my portfolio was so good - but my CV lacked any creativity.

I argued that my CV is an informational synopsis and the design reflects that, that design should have purpose and the portfolio was the main grab.

They didn't buy it!

So I went back to designing my CV - and then I decided I'll do 2 types of CV - and see which one gets more traction.

I applied to jobs using CV1 and other jobs using CV2 - one did better than the other so I stuck with that.

And it works.
 

Wardy

Well-Known Member
This seems obvious to me. Of course it needs to be 'designed' to a certain extent, just don't go over the top, like Jri says.

One or two fine rules, the odd tinted panel, maybe even an infographic element or two, nice and simple and just enough to make it stand out.
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
Hate seeing those "infographics" on the CV.
Who rates themself in software as five stars Indesign, four stars Photoshop, 4.5 stars Illustrator.... it doesn't make sense - and who rated this, your own idea on how good you are with the software?

I'd leave that off it, it is confusing and misleading.
 
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