What size to start


scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#2
I just work on A4 as it's a good format to print out or e-mail.

Vectors are non lossy so the size doesn't really matter anyway.
 
#3
Thank you.

Thats what size I normally work at but not done any large format and just had me wondering what others do. So is this the case for non logo design in vector any size?
 

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#4
Pretty much unless I need to work to a certain size or format.

I do a lot of murals and I'm working on a 1m square canvas right now.
In that case I either work to the finished size (if it fits in the work area) or a scaled down version.

Vectors can be re-sized to any size and not lose quality but the only exception is where you use raster (photoshop filters/effects).
You need to set the dpi of these in preferences and make sure they scale when enlarged.

This also applies to things like stroke widths and things.
Out of the box these things don't scale up proportionately and you have to set it to do so.
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
#5
It doesn't matter if you're doing large format or small format.

A vector logo can be resized to any size you like.

Typically, I work at a size of a business card logo - roughly 40mm x 40mm depending.

That way - when I print it out I can see if it looks ok printed out for a business card - possibly the smallest it will appear.


I can then do some large scale tests to ensure that the logo works in large scale.


As pointed out - raster effects won't be scalable - and with logos it's usually best to avoid raster effects anyway!
 

Juvik

New Member
#6
It always recommended to create logo in vector program but you should have a larger canvas size like 90% the size of your screen When 100% ZOOM NO MATTER which application you are using
 
#13
This reminded me of something interesting. While vectors themselves have infinite resolution, Adobe Illustrator doesn't.

If you scale too small, even the mighty Adobe Illustrator begins to lose information:

Link!

The example above uses CS6, and Adobe CC's internal precision has much improved since then, but as far as I know it is still finite.
 

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#14
This reminded me of something interesting. While vectors themselves have infinite resolution, Adobe Illustrator doesn't.

If you scale too small, even the mighty Adobe Illustrator begins to lose information:

Link!

The example above uses CS6, and Adobe CC's internal precision has much improved since then, but as far as I know it is still finite.

Even though Ai works in vectors which is mathematical I've found it does have its limitations and is not always that accurate.

Working too small is defiantly not advised as odd things can start to happen.
I usually try to stay at the same scale when I'm working on something so that when I nudge lines and nodes around the steps stay uniform
Same applies to the settings of a lot of effects and actions.

I've also found that sometimes it doesn't always perform a task as accurately as it should and sometimes they're a little off.
Technically speaking that shouldn't be but it sometimes does.
 
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