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Tokyo Olympics Logo

Discussion in 'Logo Design & Brand Identity Forum:' started by Aura, Sep 2, 2015.

  1. Aura

    Aura New Member

  2. skarekrow

    skarekrow Member

    I don't think it is plagiarism to be honest. It is a very simple logo and it would be quite conceivable for two designers to come up with that independently.

    It is a lot better that the logo for the 2012

    Paul
     
  3. scotty

    scotty Well-Known Member

    I can't imagine anyone making a logo so similar intentionally for such a big client although I've seen it done.
    I recall a low poly/fragmented 'Melbourne' logo which was quite distinct and well known getting ripped by a Chinese operation.

    Like scarecrow says really.
    I think pretty much every letter of the alphabet must have been given the same approach by someone at some time as it's very simple.

    Wouldn't like to have been the designer though when they were put side by side.
     
  4. skarekrow

    skarekrow Member

    What I would like to know is how do these people get away with charging thee prices they do for logo design?

    An how do the Olympic committee get away with spending that much money on such a thing.

    Paul
     
  5. skarekrow

    skarekrow Member

    Maybe we should have a competition to design the new logo and we will send them the winner.

    paul
     
  6. scotty

    scotty Well-Known Member

    Three words:

    DESIGN..........BY........COMMITTEE!

    There is not enough money, gold or diamonds in the world to budget for that.
     
  7. Paul Murray

    Paul Murray Moderator Staff Member



    The value of the work often comes down to the value of the brand it's for. In the case of the Olympics, this is a HUGE, worldwide event with millions of people watching. An agency is not going to charge the same fee as they would for a start-up or small business because the branding will be everywhere, on multiple platforms, for years. There's huge value in that and agencies know it.

    Think about an airline. They have branding on planes, on uniforms, in terminals, on TV, print media, radio, apps, etc etc. That's a lot of places a brand can/will be visible, which clearly demonstrates there's huge value in that company. Compare that to a little local taxi company – essentially they do very similar things, and will have their branding in similar locations, but on a much smaller scale. You wouldn't charge them the same as the airline, even though they have similar needs.

    On the flip side someone like the Olympics committee will not pay £2000 for an identity because they feel that budget is not representative of their brand, so they up the budget to keep it in line with what their brand is worth. Add to that the fact that it's often agencies with 100s of employees with high fees to start that do the work and you can understand why budgets and prices are so high.
     
  8. skarekrow

    skarekrow Member

    Which is great but is it right. You are going to be putting a lot more work into branding the airline than the taxi firm but why does the amount of exposure add so much to the cost. The massive exposure the airline receives will benefit the designer of the logo more that the exposure from the taxi firm. You will get more work in the future if you were the logo designer of a major brand.
    It is like me selling you a car and asking what you are going to do with it. If you are driving locally then it will be one price. If you want to do motorway driving I will charge you a lot more.

    paul
     
  9. scotty

    scotty Well-Known Member

    Not to mention that ANYTHING you do for the Olympic Games is a 'poison chalice'.
    You can't do right for doing wrong and I've heard quoted that working with them can be "career suicide".

    I used to work with a surf company that designed the Australian Olympic team's uniform for the opening ceremony.
    They looked cool but it almost sank the company.

    A few years ago I was asked to pitch to design the mascots for a certain 'large international sporting event' that takes place every four years by a very large agency. :rolleyes:
    What do you do?

    I did it but I was very relieved when mine wasn't chosen.
     
  10. Paul Murray

    Paul Murray Moderator Staff Member

    The cost comes from what the company will gain from the logo/branding. Essentially it's about brand awareness. The company/agency that design the identity will ultimately sign over IP rights of that work to the client. That in itself is a HUGE deal.

    Take the Olympics for example. How much will they make just from licensing merchandise (t-shirts, hats, keyrings, toys, drinks bottles, etc etc etc) or allowing other companies to run promotions using their branding? Don't forget all the other 'Olympic event tie-ins' that will
    ultimately crop up. That stuff isn't free, and certainly isn't cheap.

    The companies want to use the Olympic branding because they know millions of people will be hyped for the event and they want to be associated with that in order to sell whatever it is they're selling. Therefore the brand is worth millions in revenue and licensing, and as a business (design IS a business don't forget) you should price your services accordingly.

    Most people don't even know/care who the designer/s of airline branding are. Whilst you could get more 'exposure' from designing for an airline, you also could not. Don't forget there's a lot of agencies out there producing work for big clients all competing against each other. Even some of the big names still struggle to win clients and it's down to any number of factors. Exposure often means nothing.
     
  11. skarekrow

    skarekrow Member

    Very interesting indeed

    Thanks for taking the time to explain that Paul

    Paul
     

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