Starting out as a Graphic Designer


G

GJBean

New Member
#21
i would'nt say its inappopriate
Hi, I'm really a beginner in this graphic design and never have any experiences with it.
I'm just curious how many type of design graphics actually have and how can we find the suitable tutorial related to it. I did search of Youtube and Google about photoshop tutorials but I don't really know the design field (like if the tutorial related to logo or photography). I did learned and tried the tutorials I watched but is there any place where I could gain tips and feedback from people because I really want to improve myself and I have always been curious with graphics especially when I look at all those movie posters.

I'm sorry if my question is inappropriate, I'm new with this things but that won't stop me from getting serious with this field. :oops::cry:
its not inappropriate but its a very tough one to answer as theres so many aspects theres stickied threads at the top you may want to look at, heres one http://www.graphicdesignforums.co.uk/threads/starting-out-as-a-graphic-designer.23366/
 
Max Ross

Max Ross

New Member
#22
Hi guys,
Recently been starting to try and put myself out there as a graphic designer and was wondering which social media platforms are the best to do so and effective ways of using them! I have started of on instagram as it is an easy to see and read area but was wondering if there were specialist sites, which are more effective,
thanks guys
~Max (STNDesign)
 
M

MrJoe10

Member
#24
I want to tell a bit about myself and how I started. I think it can be helpful for people who were in the same situation as me. To start with I have always been interested in art and drawing. Instead of paying attention in class, I spent countless hours making drawings in my adorned A4 notebook. This later evolved to learning to use Inkscape and GIMP. Both free software. I mastered these programs and later I purchased Adobe Photoshop which offered far more options for my creativity than the programs that I had used earlier. The limitations and boundaries were erased with this piece of master software.

After working for fast food companies and call centres, I took the decision to apply for a job in a small, local advertising agency. I got the job. I imagined that it would be a "soft" work place, but it was the opposite. I called and visited businesses all around the town offering our services. We got many sales. I also designed flyers and restaurant menus, created logotypes and did all types of graphic design jobs. The most important lesson that I learned was "What you think is perfect will not always be perfect with your client". You have to listen carefully to the client. He/she is the customer, not you. Sometimes I wanted to bang my head against the wall, because the design that I suggested was rejected. Sometimes the design was seemingly "too modern" for the client.
 
hankscorpio

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
#26
Two of my pet peeves! In one poster!!

Number 16
300PPI is a mythical number - in litho print you can get away with 225 ppi minimum, depending on image content. For example, a foggy scene with little sharp detail you could produce at 150ppi, but not a persons face. A persons face you could produce it at 265 ppi.

300 - it's a nice round number - but it's not true.


Number 20
RGB images - perfectly fine to use these - in fact it's recommended to leave as RGB.

https://indesignsecrets.com/import-rgb-images-indesign-convert-cmyk-export.php

A lot of print workflows work with PDFX4 format now - where all colour content is left as original, spot colour, RGB, CMYk etc all in one file. And the file is only converted to CMYK when being RIPed.

You don't need to convert your images to CMYK at all. In fact you'll probably lose some colour that way. RGB is a much wider gamut than CMYK (the range of colours), for example, if you convert your image from RGB to CMYK you've lost some colour range, and if that image is going to be printed large format, it most likely going to use a colour profile called ProPhotoRGB - which means the CMYK is converted back into RGB for printing, and you've now lost all that lovely RGB information that was originally there, for no reason.

If you don't know your final output - leave your images as you got them.

The only valid reason I can think of for converting to CMYK is if you're being very colour critical and adjusting the CMYK values for the final output, which is only really necessary for "Coffee Table" publications and Art Books. If your publication isn't colour critical then leave as you got them.
 
@GCarlD

@GCarlD

Well-Known Member
#27
Number 20
RGB images - perfectly fine to use these - in fact it's recommended to leave as RGB.

https://indesignsecrets.com/import-rgb-images-indesign-convert-cmyk-export.php

A lot of print workflows work with PDFX4 format now - where all colour content is left as original, spot colour, RGB, CMYk etc all in one file. And the file is only converted to CMYK when being RIPed.

You don't need to convert your images to CMYK at all. In fact you'll probably lose some colour that way. RGB is a much wider gamut than CMYK (the range of colours), for example, if you convert your image from RGB to CMYK you've lost some colour range, and if that image is going to be printed large format, it most likely going to use a colour profile called ProPhotoRGB - which means the CMYK is converted back into RGB for printing, and you've now lost all that lovely RGB information that was originally there, for no reason.

If you don't know your final output - leave your images as you got them.

The only valid reason I can think of for converting to CMYK is if you're being very colour critical and adjusting the CMYK values for the final output, which is only really necessary for "Coffee Table" publications and Art Books. If your publication isn't colour critical then leave as you got them.
I was just thinking the other day, I can't remember the last time I had to set to a document as CMYK? These days we are producing for both print and web, therefore, it's a no brainer to work in RGB. Now I am struggling to think of why I would ever need to work in CMYK? The only thing I can think of is if I am given CMYK colour values to work to and/or I am 100% certain what I am producing is only going to be printed and not used online, which is rare in this day and age...

What am I missing?
 
hankscorpio

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
#28
Brand guidelines for CMYK solid colours would be the only reason. Yes set your colour Swatches to CMYK values.

But importing and using images - you can use from any source, most file formats, and most colour spaces.

You just need to make sure the final file is converted to the 'output intent' - and that output could be print (litho/screen/flexo etc.) or the output could be web/mobile devices etc.


Once you convert the image file to a colour space - you are destroying the original colour and replacing it with another colour space - and there's no way back.

Leave your image as RGB - and let the RIP do the conversion in print.

However, make sure you speak with your print provider to ensure they will allow this. The very least they can do is give you instructions for best colour conversion when making the final files.
 
L

LucyFali

New Member
#29
I want to tell a bit about myself and how I started. I think it can be helpful for people who were in the same situation as me. To start with I have always been interested in art and drawing. Instead of paying attention in class, I spent countless hours making drawings in my adorned A4 notebook. This later evolved to learning to use Inkscape and GIMP. Both free software. I mastered these programs and later I purchased Adobe Photoshop which offered far more options for my creativity than the programs that I had used earlier. The limitations and boundaries were erased with this piece of master software.

After working for fast food companies and call centres, I took the decision to apply for a job in a small, local advertising agency. I got the job. I imagined that it would be a "soft" work place, but it was the opposite. I called and visited businesses all around the town offering our services. We got many sales. I also designed flyers and restaurant menus, created logotypes and did all types of graphic design jobs. The most important lesson that I learned was "What you think is perfect will not always be perfect with your client". You have to listen carefully to the client. He/she is the customer, not you. Sometimes I wanted to bang my head against the wall, because the design that I suggested was rejected. Sometimes the design was seemingly "too modern" for the client.
Hello Joe,
what you said about you having to conform to your clients' ideas is interesting. It suggests that graphic design is costumer lead and that you as a designer become more of a 'software master' who gives life to their vision. Graphic design can take many forms, also an art form. I am sure you are aware of this. It indeed is a struggle for every creative person who is trying to make a living with her/his talent..
What software do you use daily? What kind of work were you able to produce with Inkscape and GIMP? Would you be willing to share some of your work and show how your work has evolved from doodling in your notebook during your studies to working as a graphic professional?
I am right at the start of my career with creative software. I would like to make some patterns and fantasy images.
 
L

LucyFali

New Member
#30
Y0ur War&Peace T-Shirt is such conveys such a deep message which can be easily 'read'. You're right our peace is a bit like 'a timed bomb'. It's upheld by military power...
Thank you for sharing your own website. How long have you been in graphic design?
 
scotty

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#31
LOL! I thought that was pretty clever when I did it but nobody has ever remarked on it before so thanks for that.
It's quite an old design and I think I've seen someone use the same concept since.

I left college when I was 19 or 20 so it's kicking on for 30 years.

God that makes me feel ancient. ;)
 
@GCarlD

@GCarlD

Well-Known Member
#32
LOL! I thought that was pretty clever when I did it but nobody has ever remarked on it before so thanks for that.
It's quite an old design and I think I've seen someone use the same concept since.

I left college when I was 19 or 20 so it's kicking on for 30 years.

God that makes me feel ancient. ;)
Does that mean you're 16 years old?
 
M

mile pew

New Member
#34
Graphic designers create visual concepts that inspire, inform, and transform. Use industry-leading tools to build innovative design projects and discover the skills needed to become an in-demand visual thinker and communicator.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
MindGem

MindGem

New Member
#36
I've not read every single post so sorry if I repeate something someone else already said BUT...

I've been a full time freelance illustrator for 20+years now
so what I've come to learn as the Number1 goal you should pass if you too want to work in this absolute cut-throat business is your portfolio.

I know you know about your portfolio but it's the way it is set up that sets you apart from the rest.
I've seen many portfolios and almost all of them are terrible YET the art can be fine. See there's more than just the art, it's how it's all presented, the variety and the glitter around it.
Others explain this better and in greater detail than me so I suggest you google on how to set up your portfolio and read many articles about it.
You want to have the strongest possible portfolio when you start spamming it.

Kill your darlings, show variety but let your strongest style shine over the others, present your art with equal dedication to the text and info around it, the overall look sells because the client is not an artist so they don't know how to focus on the artwork, they see it as a whole. Sad to say but assume your client is an idiot, treat her like a queen but dumb everything down, you'll win in the end. Do not feature art that you'd consider as a fluke, things you can't reapeat easely. update your portfolio often, remove things you Now find less than great (unless it's made for a specific target-group).
 
Start for Art

Start for Art

New Member
#37
Getting started with design can be a long process, i hope to help people discover the greatest in design!

startforart.com
 
S

slam629

New Member
#38
Hi thanks for the topic !
I would like to ask : today , which projects exactly I need to show in my portfolio to work in an ad agency as a graphic designer ? Today what are the most important and fundamentals projects they shouldn't be never missed in a portfolio during a creative/ad agency ? I already seen I have to learn sketch, after effects, packaging, HTML and CSS beside the classic CC suite PS, AI and ID I already know about level intermediate
 
E

EmmaFutureLondonAcademy

New Member
#39
This is a very interesting discussion, design is constantly changing and with the future of branding moving in many different ways it can be a controversial topic, is any brand really future proof, and how do you get into the industry? How can brands express themselves using new channels and evolving technologies and creative design that will last for generations? It is true we all need to understand the way in which design is changing.
Here at Future London Academy, we are constantly trying to understand design. Head over to our Youtube channel and listen to Vasjen Katro discuss how to create consistently good design every day.

https://goo.gl/XXtcQN
Future London Academy
 
lauren93

lauren93

New Member
#40
Can a few of you answers these questions for me?
What are some current design trends?
What design trend influences your work?
What trend do you think will stand the test of time?
 
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