Software

  • Thread starter courtneywilkins
  • Start date

C

courtneywilkins

New Member
#1
Is there a software out there that can take low resolution images and make them into high resolution? Can you tell me about them? Advantages/Disadvantages? Cost? Thanks!
 
scotty

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#3
Is there a software out there that can take low resolution images and make them into high resolution?

The nearest I've found is On1 Resize.

It's made for photographers wanting to increase the size of their images without losing too much quality.

I needed something to do this as I needed to work at very large format/mural size and many of the images I had were pretty small and lowish res.
They were images of vintage Chinese newspapers so it wasn't something I could just get from stock.

I was pretty dubious at first until I had a go with it and then was like "WOW!".
I wish I had some before and after examples to show but it put image information in there that didn't seem to exist before.
I still don't know how it does it.

Can you tell me about them? Advantages/Disadvantages? Cost? Thanks!

There are lots of settings to play with and it's a lot about experimenting to get the desired result so not just a case of clicking one button.
Not sure if there's a free trial or the cost but here's a link.

EDIT......$60 and there is a free trial. :D
 
hankscorpio

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
#4
I'd say there's a bit of a difference between an image being low resolution and increasing it's resolution - compared to enlarging an image for printing.

Best I've ever done and with hardware - was to print the image out at a small size, sharp and crisp resolution.

Then use a drum scanner to scan the image and then scan to the size of publication.

Was really the only way I could do it at the time.

Perhaps softwares have passed by me - am I getting old?
 
scotty

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#5
Perhaps softwares have passed by me - am I getting old?
Same Hank.

I was very doubtful of On1 as I just didn't think an image could be upsized without adding all sorts of odd effects but I was pretty amazed.
It's made for increasing the size too.

On one of the images I was using there was some text but it couldn't be read as it was all to small and pixelated.
After running On1 it could be read.

I was sat looking at the before and after thinking "EH!?!".
 
hankscorpio

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
#9
Actually there is AI based software that can do it now. Not saying it's perfect or anything but if you want to try it you can go to https://letsenhance.io/ but you do need to make an account.
Review of it is available on mashable

I've also heard of ON1 Resize although I remember it as genuine fractals before it got renamed to perfect resize and then again to ON1 resize...
I get that there are programmes that can sharpen an image, and make it less pixelated, but increasing the resolution ... I heard of genuine fractals.

But I truly don't think there is a way to make a low res image high resolution, yes, you can sharpen it, and you can enlarge them. I've used techniques in the past.

Granted I've never tried any of the softwares out there... but if you get results you're happy with then that's fine.
 
Drifter

Drifter

Member
#10
On one of the images I was using there was some text but it couldn't be read as it was all to small and pixelated.
After running On1 it could be read.
Should have cranked it up another 200% it might have read that newspaper out loud and made you a coffee .

The new upscaller Preserve Details 2.0 in Photoshop is not too shabby-
Enabled via
Preferences>Technical Preview>Enable Preserve Details 2.0.
Which then appears in Image> Image size>Resample

(Though it might be there by default in latest PS update).
 
C

courtneywilkins

New Member
#11
The nearest I've found is On1 Resize.

It's made for photographers wanting to increase the size of their images without losing too much quality.

I needed something to do this as I needed to work at very large format/mural size and many of the images I had were pretty small and lowish res.
They were images of vintage Chinese newspapers so it wasn't something I could just get from stock.

I was pretty dubious at first until I had a go with it and then was like "WOW!".
I wish I had some before and after examples to show but it put image information in there that didn't seem to exist before.
I still don't know how it does it.




There are lots of settings to play with and it's a lot about experimenting to get the desired result so not just a case of clicking one button.
Not sure if there's a free trial or the cost but here's a link.

EDIT......$60 and there is a free trial. :D

Wow thanks for the info. The photograph that I have will display at about 3 feet by 3 feet. I am afaid it will not be the right pixels sense the other times we have used it - it has been in catalogs, displaying at about an inch
 
Levi

Levi

Moderator
Staff member
#12
Wow thanks for the info. The photograph that I have will display at about 3 feet by 3 feet. I am afaid it will not be the right pixels sense the other times we have used it - it has been in catalogs, displaying at about an inch
I'd maybe check with the company doing the display what resolution they print at etc because this can make a difference too. For example there's no need for your work to be at say 1000dpi when the printer is only going to be using 300dpi.
 
hankscorpio

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
#13
And if it's going to be 3x3 feet in size - then how far away will you be standing - that will dictate the optimal resolution for printing.

There's a forumla that I use

(working in inches)
1/((distance x 0.000291) / 2) = ppi


Saw if you're viewing from 4 feet away (48 inches)

You need

1/((48 x 0.000291) / 2) = 143 ppi for final size


It's served me quite well in the past.
 
C

courtneywilkins

New Member
#14
It is for a tradeshow booth backdrop (total graphics size is 8 feet) so I do need it to be not blurry from where ever you are standing from it. I will try your formula - curious where you got the 0.000291?
 
hankscorpio

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
#15
I will try your formula - curious where you got the 0.000291?
Radian angle of an arc

(copy and pasted)
The size of the central angle of an arbitrary circle is given as the ratio of the corresponding arc-length l and the radius of the circle r. O = l (3.1) || 1 rad = 57° 1744.8" = 57.2958°, p 1° = 0.017453 rad, The unit of radian measure is the radian (rad), i.e., the central || 1 = 0.000291 rad, angle belonging to an arc.
 
C

courtneywilkins

New Member
#16
wow, that is way too much to wrap my head around but I will take your word for it. :)
 
rosssmith

rosssmith

Member
#19
The nearest I've found is On1 Resize.

It's made for photographers wanting to increase the size of their images without losing too much quality.

I needed something to do this as I needed to work at very large format/mural size and many of the images I had were pretty small and lowish res.

EDIT......$60 and there is a free trial. :D
Due to respect, scotty, As I know this is not the actual query from courtneywilkins He said low resolution images and make them into high resolution, I think we can try to make an advice using Photoshop, Because of the most common and useful tool.
 
hankscorpio

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
#20
No photoshop is not the right tool. You use the right tool for the job. Photoshop is not the tool to do this.
 
Top