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Rate Cards

Discussion in 'General Business Forum:' started by Laurajanedesigns, May 16, 2012.

  1. Hi everyone

    Im trying to go freelance, I specialise in graphic design and illustration. Im just starting out and would like some advice re Rate Cards. What exactly needs to go on there? What size do they have to be? Does anyone have any examples?

    Kind Regards

    Laura
     
  2. bigdave

    bigdave Moderator Staff Member

    My feeling would be that you shouldn't supply a fixed rate card unless you're doing some form of limited period special offer on a given product.

    Much better to print out a list of design prices and stick it to your wall along with a list of production costs for your own reference.
     
  3. pcbranding

    pcbranding Member

    Agree with Dave. Have a price list that is based on what you need to earn from a job and use that as a basis to quote on the specific job. Every project is different and therefore most quotes are different. Get as much detail as you can before mentioning prices.
    Without a reasonable understanding of what the client is looking for if you underquote that's bad for you in the long run, overquote and the client walks away.
    It might seem easy to just say 'Logo design is £X', but the client may need more or actually less than what you based your price on.
    By asking for the extra detail also enables you to see if the client is serious or just prospecting for the cheapest quote.
     
  4. Dave L

    Dave L Well-Known Member

    Do designers use rate cards as such? I thought this was an advertising sales thing.
     
  5. bigdave

    bigdave Moderator Staff Member

    I wouldn't say I use a rate card as such, more a guide of costings on my office wall for various client groups. (ie; basic/small business, complex/large business). It just helps me stay consistent with quoting and gives me a jumping off point for the most common jobs. Obviously if someone comes to me for a project with numerous variables such as branding or editorial design, I don't have a guide price for that and need to spend time with the client to find out exactly what they want and how long its going to take me.
     
  6. Katedesign

    Katedesign Well-Known Member

    Sometimes it's even worth asking what they have budgeted for. It doesn't mean you can overcharge (too much) when they say £1000 but it does give you an idea of the kind of money they are willing to spend. And check if they are including the print in the figure also.
     

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