How would I handle this contract?


mandyplants

New Member
Hi all,
I'm a relatively new graphic designer. Recently, someone I used to know through work offered me a logo design job for a pretty big client. He was asked to design the website and then came to me to ask me to design the logo (for website/and to give to her for use on the sign/bags. The only issue...I'm not sure how to write up a contract for this or what this job is considered. He owns his own design company, and that is how he received the job. Would this make the situation a work-for-hire situation? I am looking to design a contract allowing me credit and (if possible) to only give up a vector file and not the Ai file (or editable layers). I would appreciate all input!

Also, he is paying me hourly for the job and I will be writing an invoice/including pricing/payment in his contract.

ANY ADVICE?
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
You're technically a sub-contractor.

Why do you want credit?

If you give up a vector file and not the Ai file - what's the difference??? A vector file is similar to an .ai file... why wouldn't you leave the layers editable??? Why sabotage your own work?

You're looking for advice on drawing up the contract, but it seems like you are already working on an hourly rate???


There's a lot of unanswered questions here - if you want the work then work freelance as a sub-contractor for this company, and that should be the end of it.

Work smart, not hard, and hand over the fully editable layered vector files - once you agree your fee.

Depending on the complexity my opening fee for any logo project is about €450 - as you usually spend the first day or two doing nothing but research.

Research is the key element to logo design, and then after that it's per hourly rate, and sometimes logos can go for an entire year, with 2-3 hours per day... so the price goes up and up.

But it depends on complexity, but I wouldn't even open the sketchbook for less than €450.



I know another designer who had a pretty big client (a bank), and went to the meeting, and everything went well. She opened her sketchbook in the meeting and started sketching a few ideas that came out of the meeting.

She showed the sketches around for the logo - and they loved it - she went back and finished up and sent them the final logo - and they loved it! It was amazing for them to see someone envisage a logo in a meeting and bring it to life in a few days.

She sent in the invoice of €10,000 and they were not happy. They insisted it couldn't cost that much, she only spent 5 minutes doodling a logo in front of them.

She argued, 5 minutes doodling, 20 years' experience. She got her money for her very expert logo design.

That's what the fee is for. Your expertise, not how long it takes, really.
 

Wardy

Well-Known Member
You're working for him on a freelance basis, so I'm not sure you can insist on any credit as that would be his decision. Same with the files - it's not your
client so you should hand over what he wants. It's him that should be giving you a contract, then you invoice once the job's done.

I think Hank needs to be a bit more realistic regarding his fees, I'm sure he wasn't charging that much when he started out!
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
You're working for him on a freelance basis, so I'm not sure you can insist on any credit as that would be his decision. Same with the files - it's not your
client so you should hand over what he wants. It's him that should be giving you a contract, then you invoice once the job's done.

I think Hank needs to be a bit more realistic regarding his fees, I'm sure he wasn't charging that much when he started out!
I guess it may seem high.

Maybe, but you can work them down to whatever you're comfortable with. It depends on the client too, if it's Jill the baker selling cakes at the weekend at a fair, or if it's a multi-national company - a flyer for 1 would be far cheaper than the other.

Jill will make €200 for herself over the weekend, and the multi-national will make €millions.

It's all relative.
 
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