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How do you design a 6 page booklet? Am I missing something?

Discussion in 'Printing & Print Design Forum:' started by Anagoge, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. Anagoge

    Anagoge Senior Member

    Booklets have to be multiples of 4, I know this. But a client wants a 6 page newsletter.

    The client is a marketing consultant so I would assume they know what they're on about but I thought I did too. Before I go ahead and send a reply email, I'm just making sure that I'm not actually missing something obvious and that 6 pages is indeed impossible to do unless you have two blank pages.

    What other way is there? I suppose you could staple the pages together in the top left but for a newsletter that doesn't make much sense to me.
     
  2. Krey20

    Krey20 Senior Member

    I suppose it's possible depending on how it is going to be bound. It's certainly not conventional, but you can have a single page in the middle that has an overlap that is large enough to take a staple, this isn't an idea solution.
    Is it possible that they mean a six page gate fold leaflet?

    It's better to clarify the brief with the customer, and check with a printer.
    Definitely a sensible question to ask the customer in my opinion.
     
  3. Anagoge

    Anagoge Senior Member

    They sent over a PDF of a current A4 newsletter which is 4 pages. The PDF doesn't have any double page spreads which could indicate that it's supposed to be stapled top left, but it just doesn't seem right to have them attached like that.

    I'm glad I'm not going crazy though.
     
  4. tbwcf

    tbwcf Active Member

    Normally you would only expect things like a 6pp DL (A4 folded twice). Sounds like either the client is confused or it must 6 single sheets of A4 / 3 double sided...

    Defo not you being stupid!
     
  5. allyally2k

    allyally2k Senior Member

    6 page newsletter doesn't sound too strange to me... it would just be folded wouldn't it?
     
  6. tbwcf

    tbwcf Active Member

    Professional print is normally printed on large sheets, trimmed down / folded to make booklets. Everything needs to be multiples of 4 so a 4pp A4 would be a sheet of A3 folded to make 4 pages of A4, 8pp two sheets of A3 folded and so on...
     
  7. allyally2k

    allyally2k Senior Member

    I've seen plenty of newsletters that are 6 page in fact we have one at work just tri fold innit!
     
  8. Anagoge

    Anagoge Senior Member

    Ally, as I said in my second post, the example sent over is 4 pages of A4.
     
  9. jason_ballard

    jason_ballard Junior Member

    I would take a 6 page newsletter as either 6 single sheets of A4 with a staple through the top or as other people have said above a tri-fold. Not sure what how much of a creative licence you have on this. Either that or talk back to the client and see if they have anymore content to push it into an 8pp. That would be the ideal solution but its always best to ask the client if your not sure.

    Good luck :D
     
  10. Anagoge

    Anagoge Senior Member

    Client got back to me. Looks like it'll be three double sided A4s.
     
  11. br3n

    br3n Senior Member

    tri fold = 6 pages?
     
  12. berry

    berry Active Member

    That's a tri- fold flat size 630mm width x 297mm high. with the last fold turned inside to make a flat finished size of A4 210mm x 297mm


    For reference:
    Print brochures are made up in multiples of 4 ie: 4 pages/8 pages/12 pages/16 pages etc

    1 A4 folded in the middle = A5 '4 pages'
    1 A3 folded in the middle = A4 '4 pages'
    2 A3 folded in the middle = A4 '8 pages'
    3 A3 folded in the middle = A4 '12 pages
    4 A3 folded in the middle = A4 '16 pages
     
  13. ahhh i used to make so many Trifolds when working in New Zealand .. they love that shape out there for some reason :lol:
     
  14. Anagoge

    Anagoge Senior Member

    Nothing as complicated as that Berry. They just wanted three A4 pages, double sided.
     

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