Feedback on Artwork for a Song


plotkin

New Member
Hi! I have two different designs for the artwork accompanying a new song’s release. I’m curious about which design people prefer and why. Thanks!

Folder with the two designs: Designer Feedback
 
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sprout

Member
Honestly, I don’t think either of them quite do it. I see where you are going with the whole halcyon Brideshead summer thing, wanting to imply carefree, long, lazy summers from days of yore. However, rather than hint at this in an evocative, the overall effect is more a pastiche press ad in the Bakewell Courier for the local outfitters.

Also, you really need to address the copy. It, too, needs to be written in a similar vein to the period you are trying to evoke. I can’t ever imagine Waugh using an adjective like ‘corking’ to describe anything that didn’t involve the chink of crystal and the lapping of the Cam on the side of a punt.

Oh Sebastian, how perfectly wonderful. Do bring Aloysius.

The trick is to evoke an idea, of long lazy indulgence – either, as you are trying to do, with the salad days of times past, or perhaps more directly with the subject at hand. I feel the golf thing takes us too far from what you are trying to do, so there is a bit of a jarring disconnect. As you are trying to link the name CO2 with freshness, luxury, etc, perhaps focus more on a link between the name and the intended emotion, using champagne bubbles. People will then make the direct connection. By all means, dress this up with the 30s privileged backstory and set the scene. The important thing is to create the connections in people’s minds that you want them to make. If you are too obscure and distanced with it, then you just end up with disparate ideas shoe-horned together and it will work against you.
Hope this helps.
 

sprout

Member
CO2 doesn’t taste fresh or light. It has a sour or metallic taste.
But there is an awful lot of emotional capital in champagne bubbles.

Arguably, in this day and age, it is an odd name for a band, with all the negative associations with carbon dioxide now – unless they are being provocative, in a punk/disruptive way. If that is the case, then the whole brideshead halcyon approach is completely off the mark. You’d have to hear the music to really know.

Years ago I used to design cds, etc for the music industry and the first thing we’d do is get the music and play it to death in the studio, so we understood what it was about.
 

plotkin

New Member
Honestly, I don’t think either of them quite do it. I see where you are going with the whole halcyon Brideshead summer thing, wanting to imply carefree, long, lazy summers from days of yore. However, rather than hint at this in an evocative, the overall effect is more a pastiche press ad in the Bakewell Courier for the local outfitters.

Also, you really need to address the copy. It, too, needs to be written in a similar vein to the period you are trying to evoke. I can’t ever imagine Waugh using an adjective like ‘corking’ to describe anything that didn’t involve the chink of crystal and the lapping of the Cam on the side of a punt.

Oh Sebastian, how perfectly wonderful. Do bring Aloysius.

The trick is to evoke an idea, of long lazy indulgence – either, as you are trying to do, with the salad days of times past, or perhaps more directly with the subject at hand. I feel the golf thing takes us too far from what you are trying to do, so there is a bit of a jarring disconnect. As you are trying to link the name CO2 with freshness, luxury, etc, perhaps focus more on a link between the name and the intended emotion, using champagne bubbles. People will then make the direct connection. By all means, dress this up with the 30s privileged backstory and set the scene. The important thing is to create the connections in people’s minds that you want them to make. If you are too obscure and distanced with it, then you just end up with disparate ideas shoe-horned together and it will work against you.
Hope this helps.
Thanks for the feedback! I was actually using this (public-domain) old Coke ad as the reference :)
 

plotkin

New Member
But there is an awful lot of emotional capital in champagne bubbles.

Arguably, in this day and age, it is an odd name for a band, with all the negative associations with carbon dioxide now – unless they are being provocative, in a punk/disruptive way. If that is the case, then the whole brideshead halcyon approach is completely off the mark. You’d have to hear the music to really know.

Years ago I used to design cds, etc for the music industry and the first thing we’d do is get the music and play it to death in the studio, so we understood what it was about.
So Carbon Dioxide is the name of a song, not the band. The band is "J. Bryan Marcus". This is the song if you'd like to hear: http://bit.ly/CO2SongReferenceforDesigners
 

Wardy

Well-Known Member
There's just too much going on there for me. I think you need to lose all that text and just have Co2 - Enjoy the Taste (smaller)
and then your name as if it was the logo. You can still make it look like an ad but I think you need to have a more colourful and
summery image to match the song.
 
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