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Copyright on Brushes/Fonts

Discussion in 'Graphic Design Forum:' started by hesky, Feb 23, 2011.

  1. hesky

    hesky New Member

    Hey people..!

    Im an amateur at graphic design and stuff however, very creative...! I have always been photoshopping etc...! I have began to raise interest and have my first client to make them an A5 leaflet within Adobe. My question is...

    I downloaded some fonts and brushes to incorporate within the design. However, how are copyright rules towards this. The client is my friend who needs a directory doing of the local businesses in a small town. The leaflet is only to be served by a niche market for advertising purposes. Was wondering if it's worth worrying this much for a font and couple of brushes? Couple of people have said don't worry no one will even notice this however i want to ensure i am doing this legitimately lol...!

    Thanks for your time and hope you can help me,

  2. spottypenguin

    spottypenguin Active Member

    The correct answer is to read the licensing notes of any brushes and fonts you download, they are always available and will stipulate exactly what the terms are.

    I understand what you say about it being a small job and only local etc. but it only takes one person to recognize a font / brush not authorised for commercial use and....... :icon_scared:

    There are plenty of free fonts etc. that have no restriction; I'd start with those if I were you. If in doubt, don't use it. - I think anyway
  3. Paul Murray

    Paul Murray Moderator Staff Member

    Be wary when downloading Photoshop brushes as many people create them from copyrighted images, then release them free for commercial use without actually having ownership of the original images they were created from.
  4. YellowPeril

    YellowPeril Member


    Always be wary of using something created by someone else, because however obscure it's liable to bite you in the arse.

    I one used a small section of a large piece ofcoloured printed marbling, converted it to mono and then used the pattern to gloss varnish on a white background to replicate 'frost' patterns on some Christmas confectionery packaging for a very limited audiemce.

    The marbler recognised it as her creation and was exceptionally miffed and it cost my company money.

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