• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Cool writing stylen


#1
hello again people,

This is not a formal question, just need some light shed on this topic.

So since I had taken an intrest in design, I couldn't help but notice this one thing.
When ever I see hand draw designs/concepts, the font they use to label their drawings is always the same.

I really like the style of the text. I sure some one on here could share some knowledge.

I would like to learn how to to write in this format.I have seen some people using a ruler to write each letter.... If that makes sense ?

Any other style of text.. Well , just looks crappy.
So this is something I need to learn.I love hand drawing designs but when I label parts etc, it's spoils my efforts !

Cheers guys
 

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#2
You meaning the notes like Fig 1, Fig 2 kind of thing on older type drawings? A bit like blue prints?
Think I know what you mean but would know better if I saw an example.

A lot of that kind of thing was done by hand and it's just a case of learning to do it but I'm sure there will be a font out there to fit the bill.
 
#4
That's the style, it's look very nice when used on hand sketches. I've had learnt that architects write like this over their drawings.
 

Wardy

Well-Known Member
#5
I would have thought that most architects would use their own hand-writing unless it's particularly bad.

It would be very time-consuming to use a ruler, even for line guides. I don't think that example is particularly legible myself. As Scotty
says, there are hundreds of fonts out there that one could use to imitate hand lettering. It's similar to comic book lettering, you might think
it looks hand-drawn, but it's usually done on a computer theses days.
 
#6
I would have thought that most architects would use their own hand-writing unless it's particularly bad.

It would be very time-consuming to use a ruler, even for line guides. I don't think that example is particularly legible myself. As Scotty
says, there are hundreds of fonts out there that one could use to imitate hand lettering. It's similar to comic book lettering, you might think
it looks hand-drawn, but it's usually done on a computer theses days.
Hi Wardy, thank you for the comment.
I'm strictly talking about hand designs as I mentioned.

I've witnessed this style of text used over and over again. It does seem like consuming, although when all you have is hand drawn material I think the aesthetics of your writing is crucial.

Surprisingly I found a bunch of videos on YouTube on how to write like this. I suppose practice makes perfect.
I know their is a font out there That could match it. unfortunately I haven't got the resources to digitally design yet.

I was just curious to see if any one was taught this? Or if any one uses this style when designing.

Here's a link for a nice insight to what I mean.

 

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#7
LOL!

I was taught hand lettering/typography back at college because scamps and visuals were hand done with Pantone markers and whatever else.
It wasn't quite the same as we had to learn how to quickly simulate different fonts and the emphasis was on the aesthetic rather than the legibility.
We also did Technical Illustration and one technique was similar to that with the ruler but we used the parallel motion on our drawing boards for the base-line rather than the downstrokes.
 
#8
LOL!

I was taught hand lettering/typography back at college because scamps and visuals were hand done with Pantone markers and whatever else.
It wasn't quite the same as we had to learn how to quickly simulate different fonts and the emphasis was on the aesthetic rather than the legibility.
We also did Technical Illustration and one technique was similar to that with the ruler but we used the parallel motion on our drawing boards for the base-line rather than the downstrokes.
Sounds cool, I wish I went to college to study design.

Probably not to late, except my outgoing a are to large now for me to take time.

I'll have to home study for now. As for the drawings I'm getting sick better every day, just need to improve the way i label functions etc.

I like the way the text I'm referring to looks on paper. It's not hand writing and it's not block.
For example it says all the horizontal strokes are slighting inclined, pointing upwards from left to right.

So in your own opinion, if your presenting a hand design to potential designer/investor/engineer.

Do you think it would look for presentable/credible if the writing style was in this format ??
 

Wardy

Well-Known Member
#9
That brings back memories, Scotty!

I think it is purely down to the individual and the style of their handwriting, and if their handwriting isn't so good they need
to practise something like your example.
 

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#10
That brings back memories, Scotty!

I think it is purely down to the individual and the style of their handwriting, and if their handwriting isn't so good they need
to practise something like your example.
A bit of a trip mate. :D

That kind of hand lettering was an art form that was never intended to be. Just a practical way of getting information on a page by hand that could be easily read.
CAD has all but killed it.

Saying that. In design, hand lettering has had a massive renaissance over the past few years and it's still continuing.
People like to see the art/craft behind the lettering now.
Saying that, a lot of it is hand drawn and then worked over in vectors unless it's for that true artisan look.

One of my first jobs was at a newspaper and a big part of my day was hand lettering headers and such on a drawing board.
Thing is it had to look anything but hand done which is kind of a flip side to today. o_O
 

Wardy

Well-Known Member
#11
I know, I used to get asked to hand-write no end of stuff that just couldn't be typeset.

I love to see those hand-written chalk boards you still see in pubs, there's a definite art to it.
 

Levi

Moderator
Staff member
#12
It's just writing in isometric view rather than planar hence the slant. It's the same view as often used for the 3D images used on plans.
 

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#13
I know, I used to get asked to hand-write no end of stuff that just couldn't be typeset.

I love to see those hand-written chalk boards you still see in pubs, there's a definite art to it.
Same here mate but spotting a bit of bad kerning can ruin your pint. ;)