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Choosing Fonts when Designing a Logo

Discussion in 'Logo Design & Brand Identity Forum:' started by Conway, Sep 20, 2010.

  1. Conway

    Conway New Member

    Often when I approach a logo design project I have on a number of occassions chosen a suitable font straight from what is available on my computer systems fonts list, and then I have designed some sort of relevant iconic/symbol/mark to go along with the font to complete the logo.

    But this has led me to question my methods when designing a logo. The problem for me is that I don’t ever feel completely satisfied that I can claim my logo designs to be 100% my own work, the fact that i am pulling a font straight off my computer systems font list which has been painstakingly crafted by a typographer designer and using it as part of my own design via a few selection clicks of my mouse just does not sit right with me, it makes me feel that only half the logo design is my own and the other half is the work of the typography designer.

    Id be very interested to hear from other designers who feel they are doing the same thing when designing a logo, or maybe you don't, maybe some logo designers really do design their own custom font as well as any symbols to go with it, which I fully respect. However if you don't design your own customised fonts nor do you use fonts straight off your computer system how do you go about choosing them? What places (URLs) do you visit to purchase them? and how do you feel about doing this? Let me know your thoughts please guys...
  2. dot design

    dot design Member

    Tricky to design your own custom font per job as this is a very time consuming thing to do and sometimes there is no way budgets can allow for it or the clients just isn't interested.

    I sometimes make alterations or refinements to help the typography sit better with the graphic or icon.
  3. Katedesign

    Katedesign Well-Known Member

    It is part of the skill of design in choosing the right font for the job - think of how many 'self-designed' logos you see that have a totally inappropriate font. As Dot Design says sometimes you might make alterations to the font. . . but sparingly - someone has designed it after all!

    Using a non-custom font is common practice - the NHS logo is Frutiger for example and it means that you can use that font also for body text in letters, brochures etc. Most big companies will have a couple fo fonts as part of their corporate identity.
  4. I4Visual

    I4Visual Member

    It's really hard to find the right font, that represents both your personal taste and that of the comapny's corporate image.
    I would just say, avoid anything too squiggly, flashy or 'Neat', sure having a nice posh font may work for targeting middle/upper class clients, but it will just look pants to us working class type of people, that's of course not the only issue at hand, just giving an example there:)
  5. bigdave

    bigdave Moderator Staff Member

    generally speaking, I find it easier to decide what I want the logo to say and the feel Im after and then find a font to suit, rather than picking a font and designing around it.
  6. tezdread

    tezdread Member

    The font selection for me is one of the last things when doing a logo. First pen & pad to sketch out ideas, including the text to be used, then on to the graphic (if there's going to be one) once the graphic is finished then on to choose a font to compliment the graphic. If there isn't going to be a graphic at all and the logo will use only text (creatively) the font will still be the last choice.

    Minor adjustments to the text to individualise it but I'd never try and design my own font so unless a client wanted a brand new font and was willing to pay for a professional typographer to design one for them they will only get what is already out there. /
  7. SparkCreative

    SparkCreative Member

    Even massive brands don't necessarily use custom fonts. Nike, for instance.

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