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Choosing Colour schemes?

Discussion in 'Website Design Forum:' started by Twisted Tree Media, Jun 30, 2013.

  1. Hey guys,
    I'm thinking of making some mock templates to show clients, but I'm struggling with inspiration into color schemes, i don't like using some of the tools you get from sites where it finds a good match within a certain spectrum and you can choose light or dark themes etc.
    I'm trying to find an interior designer that i can talk to about color schemes, they're entire business is based on create an environment with color and layout, and thats what I like to think about websites! has to be attractive and interesting too look at, and keep the person hooked, colours are very subconscious, make us act on impulse and we associate colours with emotions!

    So how do you choose your colour schemes?
    I know I've gone all in depth and boring, but I think its a pretty cool understanding!
     
  2. scotty

    scotty Well-Known Member

    Could do worse than orange or purple.
     
  3. Levi

    Levi Moderator Staff Member

    well I was taught about colour theory during gcse/a-level (if not earlier) graphic design and btec art and design foundation (along with art/design history etc).... it pretty much covers all the stuff the interior designer will try and sell to a client when it comes to colours lol

    Then you have colours associated with trades (green for 'gardeners' for example), emotions, the favourite colours of the client (mines on the red end of the spectrum) or even the colours that link to a season (my reds go more towards autumn for example). There's also my personal favourite... the pantone colour of the year (didn't even know they did this till a couple of years back, not that it makes any difference to me lol) or even the 'in vogue' colours... just look in the shops at the seasons must have colours :wacko:
    But to simplify it - look at colour theory to pick colours that compliment or contrast with one another (it's all explained) and try to keep to 3 to 4 colours max in my experience, more can often start to muddy things unless they're there for specific reasons, say 'section' colours.
     
  4. Tony Hardy

    Tony Hardy Guest

    I have a very basic understanding of colour theory. Nothing that I could teach anybody or anything, but knowing a few things like complimentary colours tends to help me at times.

    Then, what I do...after deciding on one main colour, I get myself into Kuler and play around with all of the different colour theory options. There's not much science to it for me. Literally go with what looks the best with colour. Once you've got the concept hammered out, some colours become very apparent anyway.
     

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