student freelance dilemma

cynical_person

New Member
I am a recent grad, looking for my 1st break in industry. I am offering freelance services on the side to build folio and skills etc. I had an interview last year (just before covid), and the feedback I got was, I was unsuccessful because I freelance and they felt I was building up a freelance business and just looking for a full time role to tide me over, while I continue building my freelance business.

Of course my heart was broken. This was the 2nd time I had feedback like this. I honestly feel like I am in between a rock and hard place. I can't afford to turn paid work away, even though it's only small ad hoc logos and business cards and the work I have produced for my freelance has been something I am very proud of. I spend more time on it than what I actually get paid, but I truly thought all this would make me look employable. I am about to relaunch and I am unsure if I should even consider showing the freelance work?

Any thoughts would be very welcomed please.
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
You need to tell them that the freelance is to tide you over until you get a full-time job.
It shouldn't be going against you.

Your passionate about design, and if a client from the freelance you did in the past came to you you'd bring them through the company.

I actually had this as policy in another place, and it worked, whoever brought in the work would get 10% commission, there was no limit on the commission, bring in a million print, and they got 10%. Bring in 1000 in print, they got 10%.

I'd even be that bold in an interview if someone questioned my freelance over the full time job, make it clear that you want to work for them and ask if they offer a commission on work being brought in by employees.


Basically I started this because people were doing little bits for friend and family, and it was all free. We had about 5% production committed to doing free work for employees.

Once I brought in the 10% commission for work brought in by employees all of a sudden the production was .5% free work.
At the end of the day, the employee got a little bonus for bringing in work, which was a huge incentive for them to not offer free work for friends and family - of course we did it at a cheaper rate, mates rates you'd call it.
 

cynical_person

New Member
You need to tell them that the freelance is to tide you over until you get a full-time job.
It shouldn't be going against you.

Your passionate about design, and if a client from the freelance you did in the past came to you you'd bring them through the company.

I actually had this as policy in another place, and it worked, whoever brought in the work would get 10% commission, there was no limit on the commission, bring in a million print, and they got 10%. Bring in 1000 in print, they got 10%.

I'd even be that bold in an interview if someone questioned my freelance over the full time job, make it clear that you want to work for them and ask if they offer a commission on work being brought in by employees.


Basically I started this because people were doing little bits for friend and family, and it was all free. We had about 5% production committed to doing free work for employees.

Once I brought in the 10% commission for work brought in by employees all of a sudden the production was .5% free work.
At the end of the day, the employee got a little bonus for bringing in work, which was a huge incentive for them to not offer free work for friends and family - of course we did it at a cheaper rate, mates rates you'd call

Hey Hankscorpio !

Yh I agree it shouldn't be going against me, maybe it was just an excuse to not take me on?

Anyways, I really appreciate your reply and suggestion about the commissioned work, bringing the new clients into the business.

Thank you for replying.
 

PS4Fat

New Member
In some of the full time roles I have worked in (Office/Design/Retail based) they tend to want the candidate to work with them exclusively.

One of reasons against multiple jobs is because they feel you might be overworked/tired to carry on working both jobs and as a result not giving 100% (I actually read the small print in my contract). Maybe they felt the same way in your case?
 

cynical_person

New Member
In some of the full time roles I have worked in (Office/Design/Retail based) they tend to want the candidate to work with them exclusively.

One of reasons against multiple jobs is because they feel you might be overworked/tired to carry on working both jobs and as a result not giving 100% (I actually read the small print in my contract). Maybe they felt the same way in your case?
Yes, it's possible that was the reason. I am only a junior though trying to get my foot in the door and trying to be proactive in my spare time while looking for a role. Feel's like I can't do anything right to land a job. They always seem to find an excuse to say no and this was the last 2 feedback I got. Just feels like an excuse.
 

PS4Fat

New Member
It is hard at moment, I'm looking for a full time job too and so far this week I've had 1 rejection everyday - 3 so far, it's a new personal best for me haha

Hang in there, keep trying and don't give up!
 

cynical_person

New Member
Sorry you are having a hard time too. Thank you for your encouraging words and taking the time to reply. I've decided to focus my energy on more personal creative projects.

It is hard at moment, I'm looking for a full time job too and so far this week I've had 1 rejection everyday - 3 so far, it's a new personal best for me haha

Hang in there, keep trying and don't give up!
 
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