New to the forums - looking for people with the same interests

TommoK

New Member
Hey! As I said, I'm new to the forums, but not necessarily to graphic design. I find that I tend to gravitate more towards Swiss design, but I don't know enough about it or know anyone that does, to fully attempt recreating it.

I would love to know of there was anyone willing to introduce me to it and/or bounce ideas off of going forward .
 

fisicx

Active Member
Traditional Swiss design includes lots of fretwork on their houses. The Dirndl is a typical alpine costume. Suppose you could also include cow bells and coloured halters.
 

TommoK

New Member
Traditional Swiss design includes lots of fretwork on their houses. The Dirndl is a typical alpine costume. Suppose you could also include cow bells and coloured halters.
Ah no, sorry, I meant more to the effect of the attached.
 

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Wardy

Well-Known Member
Ok, so it's basically a retro, 50s/60s design style. What do you mean, that you 'gravitate towards' that style? Surely it will depend on the brief you are given by client,
unless you're hoping to produce your own posters maybe.

I'm not sure what you're hoping to get on here, this isn't a teaching platform. We would be happy to offer a critique if you were to post some work, but we can't tell you how to do it.
Maybe there are some books that could help you?
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
Yeah, buy some books etc. How we all probably got going. Spent hours in the college library back in the day. No such thing as internet back then.

Research your styles and the people who created them. Read learn. And try to recreate them yourself.

Sounds like a fun expirement.
 

TommoK

New Member
Ok, so it's basically a retro, 50s/60s design style. What do you mean, that you 'gravitate towards' that style? Surely it will depend on the brief you are given by client,
unless you're hoping to produce your own posters maybe.

I'm not sure what you're hoping to get on here, this isn't a teaching platform. We would be happy to offer a critique if you were to post some work, but we can't tell you how to do it.
Maybe there are some books that could help you?
I figured the best outcome to learn was through reading up on it, I'm not at a loss on that. But, I thought there may be members on here who could tell me which their favourites were etc. You know, a bit of harmless discussion on the subject.
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
I really know nothing of this stuff. I have never read a design book in my life. I read some typography books back in college. But i dont read any design books, magazines or how tos.

Generally just create what I like. How I like it etc.

If a client wanted a 1950s Swiss design feel to it I'd just do it with some internet research etc. But I just end up doing it the way I want it to look
 

sprout

Active Member
Just do some research online for key theorists and practitioners of Swiss typography and design and, as others have said, find some books about them for more in-depth reading. Not wishing to sound negative, but I find it hard, these days, to see why anyone asks such questions when the information is right at our fingertips all of the time now. To save you one or two google searches, look at Max Miedinger (designer of Neue Haas Grotesk, the forerunner of Helvetica) and Josef Müller Brockman, designer an author. That should get you started.
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
I think they were looking to chat about it if anyone had any insights. Apparently nobody has other than the usual routes of research.

Very niche subject really.
 

TommoK

New Member
I really know nothing of this stuff. I have never read a design book in my life. I read some typography books back in college. But i dont read any design books, magazines or how tos.

Generally just create what I like. How I like it etc.

If a client wanted a 1950s Swiss design feel to it I'd just do it with some internet research etc. But I just end up doing it the way I want it to look
As do I, really. But, I'm quite interested in the mechanics of it -if you will.
Just do some research online for key theorists and practitioners of Swiss typography and design and, as others have said, find some books about them for more in-depth reading. Not wishing to sound negative, but I find it hard, these days, to see why anyone asks such questions when the information is right at our fingertips all of the time now. To save you one or two google searches, look at Max Miedinger (designer of Neue Haas Grotesk, the forerunner of Helvetica) and Josef Müller Brockman, designer an author. That should get you started.
Appreciate the suggestions, thanks. As far as asking about it, I'm aware I can Google it, but where's the fun in that? I'm just looking for people who might be as equally excited about the topic as I am.
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
As do I, really. But, I'm quite interested in the mechanics of it -if you will.
As I do with all projects.

I do background research and build up a portfolio of items. Like you have already done.

I guess I just study it - I don't really have a mechanical process. I just do it.
Devise methods that work for me - that's why I don't like looking or copying other people's techniques.
I do what works for me. Come up with a system that I use and understand.
 

sprout

Active Member
I'm just looking for people who might be as equally excited about the topic as I am.
My apologies, I thought you were just looking to learn more about the subject. As for being enthused and bouncing ideas off others, that’s what this place is all about – when we’re not trying to explain, yet again, the demerits of crowd-source websites and why they will never amount to a sustainable career, to wannabe designers brimming with alacrity, but with absolutely no knowledge, experience or qualifications.

There are people here who know their stuff and will get enthused over design specifics, so the best thing to do is throw specifics in to the pot and see what comes out.

I, for one, can talk about the perfection of a particular curve on a particular glyph, or rail against bad kerning, for hours – usually after a couple of pints and the company of the right group of mates. Try type-talk with a group of friends with diverse interests and you’ve never seen so many eyes roll so quickly.
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
I have never talked about my work with my friends. My friends have zero interest in design. And if I told them what I do I would be met with blank stares, as it means nothing to them.

That's why I am on forums. At least I can talk about this stuff during the day, and I have other conversations with other people :D
 

sprout

Active Member
And if I told them what I do I would be met with blank stares, as it means nothing to them.
… that’s exactly the rolling-eye thing. Many of my friends have no idea. For them, being interested in type is a hair’s breadth away from being at the end of Clapham Station with a notebook. They just don’t get it. Fair enough. Why should they? However, I do have groups of friends from both college days and back when I worked in London, who usually come up a couple of times a year, for whom design has the same kind of geek-passion it has for me. Thankfully, we don’t talk about it the whole of the time we are together (actually, it does usually descend, fairly quickly, into profanity and slightly suspect toilet humour), but for those without an interest at all, I am sure it can all get pretty tedious – people like my long-suffering wife, for example!! She’s had a whole year’s reprieve this year.
 
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