Artworker terminology question

PS4Fat

New Member
Hello all, just joined a few mins ago.

I do a little artworking every now and then and heard a phrase by someone and it's way too late to ask what it means.
The phrase I heard is 'SS' I think it's an abbreviation about an image printed at 100%?

I think it means 'Scaled Size' but that's purely a guess, any enlightenment is appreciated!!
 

sprout

Active Member
It simply means ‘same size’, so yes, it’s something that is produced at 100% size of the original.
 

PS4Fat

New Member
Thanks Sprout! (y) It makes sense now - so I guess it means not to scale images within a frame by 86.56% for example

I can't tell you how long I've had that question at the back of my mind!
 

Naheed

Member
Hello all, just joined a few mins ago.

I do a little artworking every now and then and heard a phrase by someone and it's way too late to ask what it means.
The phrase I heard is 'SS' I think it's an abbreviation about an image printed at 100%?

I think it means 'Scaled Size' but that's purely a guess, any enlightenment is appreciated!!
As per my knowledge, the phrase that you heard 'SS' is an abbreviation of same size.
It does not mean Scaled Size in art working. @sprout us 100% correct.
I hope it helps you out. If you need more explanation let me know.
 

PS4Fat

New Member
Thanks Naheed, am I right in thinking that when images are scaled up/down within InDesign they all need to be resampled in PS to 100% before print?
The reason for this is to avoid jagged/steppy lines?
 

sprout

Active Member
You can scale a 300ppi image down in InDesign and output for print at 300ppi and it will be fine. No need to resample down in Photoshop. Naturally you just can’t scale up from 100%@300ppi, either in Photoshop, or InDesign without quality loss. That said, the algorithms in the latest PS are very, very good at doing this – within reason. Garbage in. Garbage out.
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
InDeisgn
Go to Window>Info
Select the image and you will see two things
Effective and Actual

Actual refers to the native file and it's native resolution.
Effective is about the resolution effect when the image is scaled in InDesign.

For example - a 72ppi image placed in inDesign will always show "Actual 72ppi"
But scale that image to 24% and it will show Actual 72 ppi - Effective 300ppi.

That's very simple to work out - 72/24%=300


Always check your Effective Resolution is high enough for the print output required.
 

PS4Fat

New Member
All points above are clear and make sense.

Another issue: I have an image at 300ppi @100% but when I scale down to 80% the effective ppt is 375ppi which is great but when I export an interactive pdf I can clearly see jagged/steppy lines. I usually correct this by going into PS and reducing image to 80%. This image now appears in ID at 300ppi (actual and effective) and its now 100% > Probably a crazy workflow but it's the only reliable way I have removed the jagged/steppy lines. Any tips or better workflow?

For ref the pdf settings I mentioned above are: Interactive> Image handling: Jpg (lossy), Max, 300ppi) I use these settings for email friendly pdfs.

The above issue is never a problem with the 'Print' method of exporting a pdf, I tend not to use this as the file sizes increases drastically

Thanks
 

hankscorpio

Moderator
Staff member
All points above are clear and make sense.

Another issue: I have an image at 300ppi @100% but when I scale down to 80% the effective ppt is 375ppi which is great but when I export an interactive pdf I can clearly see jagged/steppy lines. I usually correct this by going into PS and reducing image to 80%. This image now appears in ID at 300ppi (actual and effective) and its now 100% > Probably a crazy workflow but it's the only reliable way I have removed the jagged/steppy lines. Any tips or better workflow?

For ref the pdf settings I mentioned above are: Interactive> Image handling: Jpg (lossy), Max, 300ppi) I use these settings for email friendly pdfs.

The above issue is never a problem with the 'Print' method of exporting a pdf, I tend not to use this as the file sizes increases drastically

Thanks
The interactive PDF will downsample your image.

So you will need to go to the PDF compression area - and set that to what you need.

For onscreen 150ppi is fine.
 
Top