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TV and Film Quote Copyright

Discussion in 'General Business Forum:' started by dot design, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. dot design

    dot design Member

    Morning all, haven't been around these parts for awhile now but should be from now.

    Wanted to pick some brains if I may...

    Where do people stand in terms of using well know quotes from say television programmes and film in their work or as prints forsale?

    Any help very grateful.
     
  2. Stationery Direct

    Stationery Direct Administrator Staff Member

    Hey G

    Don't see it being a problem, is it just the quote on its own or accompanied by a picture for example of the person saying it?

    If it's just the quote which anyone could have said then it would be diffcult to prove copyright infringement, besides you wouldn't be able to copyright or trademark a generic term or saying (I think), for example: "Say hello to my little friend", a popular phrase from Scarface, that text on a tshirt would be no problem as actually anyone could have said it.

    No expert but maybe others have views on this?
     
  3. dot design

    dot design Member

    Hi D

    It would literally be just text, no images CR would be a problem there. Ok I'll check out further but given the number of quotes on tshirts and posters etc I've seen I think you're right.

    Cheers
     
  4. Carmen Davies

    Carmen Davies New Member

    Did you find out any more about this? I am also in the process of creating cards and prints etc using just phrases although not from films just general quotes maybe some from songs etc. I would have thought that words could not be copy written as anyone can say it. :icon_confused:
     
  5. squeezee

    squeezee Member

    Just because they can't prove it doesn't mean that you won't get a summons/C&D letter/claim for damages etc. If you are profiting from someone else's work you are fair game for their lawyers, big companies such as Disney employ lots of people to search for pirates.
     
  6. Dave L

    Dave L Well-Known Member

    I don't think there's an easy answer but I don't think the idea that 'anyone could have said it' would stand up under challenge. I understand that short phrases and the like can be exempt from copyright where they're not trademarked, etc., but if a movie studio or author could demonstrate that, for example, the phrase 'do you feel lucky, punk?' (or whatever) was intrinsically linked to a specific media product and, as such, had value because of that link then they might have the basis for a legal claim.

    Short answer: dunno.
     

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