Image creation advice


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smmrgrl629

New Member
#1
Hi designers! I have been working on a start up business for renting certain items, but I do not want to use stock photos of these items as I am trying to avoid legal issues. My thought was to have my item images graphically created and non brand specific. I have like 70 different items, however, and am totally in the dark as to how much this could cost me. I am funding this start up myself, so my budget is not huge. I am seeing on freelancer sites that rates range from about $30-70 per hour. Realistically, how long could a project like this take? Any advice here is greatly appreciated! TIA!
 
Stationery Direct

Stationery Direct

Administrator
Staff member
#2
Do you have a visual of something similar so we can see how intricate etc?
 
fisicx

fisicx

Active Member
#4
If you are renting the items why not just take pictures and put them on the site. That way you can have shots from multiple angles, close ups etc.
 
S

smmrgrl629

New Member
#5
If you are renting the items why not just take pictures and put them on the site. That way you can have shots from multiple angles, close ups etc.
It has to do with the business model that I have chosen. Any idea on how much a project like this would cost me?
 
scotty

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#6
But my branding has a clean, fun and modern feel, so hoping for something along those lines, but simple.
From what you're saying, it sounds like you're looking for "vector illustrations" and if you're wanting that clean, simple, no outline feel then people usually refer to them as "flat vectors".

Depending on the item, these could vary dramatically how long they take to produce as something like a high chair is actually quite complicated viewed at an angle and even an experienced Illustrator with good reference could easily spend a couple of hours on that making something nice.

I'm guessing that all your high chairs for example may not be the same brand or model so maybe the way to go would be to produce a simple, generic image (kind of like an icon) and then expand on this with example pic's and/or description as the user clicks through?

Realistically, you're going to want someone that will stick with it and do the whole lot plus any further additions to keep the continuity looking the same.
 
S

smmrgrl629

New Member
#7
From what you're saying, it sounds like you're looking for "vector illustrations" and if you're wanting that clean, simple, no outline feel then people usually refer to them as "flat vectors".

Depending on the item, these could vary dramatically how long they take to produce as something like a high chair is actually quite complicated viewed at an angle and even an experienced Illustrator with good reference could easily spend a couple of hours on that making something nice.

I'm guessing that all your high chairs for example may not be the same brand or model so maybe the way to go would be to produce a simple, generic image (kind of like an icon) and then expand on this with example pic's and/or description as the user clicks through?

Realistically, you're going to want someone that will stick with it and do the whole lot plus and further additions to keep the continuity looking the same.

Scotty, thank you for this advice.

Yes, you are correct, I am looking for a generic way to display the products. We may have different brands of the same item in stock, so the customer may get one out of a group of several brands.

I'm still far from certain as to how to price this though. I understand that the time put in could vary, but what could be a good starting point? Even for, say, 30 items? I don't want to be insulting with my price point, but I also don't want to kill my budget either.
 
scotty

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#8
I think you've got the right approach here. The only one really in my opinion.

Maybe if you could put a list of say 10 or so random examples of your items then people on here might give you a better idea.
If they're done in a fairly simple, flat icon style then I'd very roughly allow for an average of about 1 hour each but that's ballpark and using someone that could crunch through them.
 
Wardy

Wardy

Well-Known Member
#9
Not sure how many people would want to rent something based on a clip art-style illustration as opposed to a photo, where you could more
clearly see the quality and appearance of the product. I think it would be more cost-effective to use photos in the long run.
 
Paul Murray

Paul Murray

Moderator
Staff member
#10
Am I correct in thinking that you want to give a depiction of an item without being specific about what the customer may receive? So to use your high chair as an example, the customer needs to rent a high chair, maybe for an event or something, they come to you, you take some details and give them a high chair form your inventory? They don't pick it specifically, you just give them X brand high chair because it does what they want? Is that right?
 
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