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Illustrator Question - Mind gone blank!

Discussion in 'Adobe Forum:' started by linziloop, Nov 3, 2011.

  1. linziloop

    linziloop Member

    Hi guys, I've got myself stuck within Illustrator with something I know is really simple but my mind has gone blank, so much so I'm not even having any luck in google cos I don't know what I'm searching for! Haha!

    Basically, to explain, say I have a rounded edge rectangle, and I want to put an exact copy of this rectangle over the top of it, only smaller, but keep the gap between the edges of the two rectangles uniform all the way around, how do i do it?!

    I've done it before (without using stroke as I need to fill each rectangle with a gradient) but I can't remember for the life of me what I did.

    I know one of you guys will :icon_wink:
     
  2. djb

    djb Member

    What about adding a stroke to it and then outlining the stroke?

    Object: Path: Outline Stroke
     
  3. linziloop

    linziloop Member

    That's one of of doing it (thanks!) but I know there was another way where the two rectangles stayed intact rather than a stroke and a rectangle, and it's driving me mad not remembering. For now though, that'll do nicely :) I can't believe I forgot that, been a while since I've drawn anything in Illustrator, had my head down in a massive InDesign project for aaaages :icon_yawn:
     
  4. linziloop

    linziloop Member

    Actually, I do properly need to remember that method I mentioned, due to what I'm doing, I need a perfect copy of the original rectangle, made smaller inside the original, (so the same spacing all around needed) which I then need to chop in half. So, the outline thing is no good :icon_confused:
     
  5. pcbranding

    pcbranding Member

    Path> Offset path> Enter millimetre offset (positive or negative)
    :)
     
  6. djb

    djb Member

    But if you outline the stroke and then release the compound path you end up with two rectangles with corners in proportion? Or am I not getting this!

    Edit: Or what Paul said, which takes about half the effort!
     
  7. linziloop

    linziloop Member

    Aha! You STAR! That's EXACTLY what I was looking for, phew! Thank you!
     
  8. linziloop

    linziloop Member

    Do you!? Ah right, ok, I'm not sure to be honest. Seems I have two perfectly viable options. Time to have a good refresher in Illustrator me thinks, can't believe how much you can forget in such a short time.
     

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