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Hi there - not freelance yet (a bit scared!)


Bethune

Junior Member
#1
LOL...

Yes, I'm still in a studio - and I'm getting on a bit (47). Of course, I have thought of going freelance, but I have always wondered if there is a 'half way house' that would ease me into working for myself...

That's what I'm working on at the moment - I'm trying to convince my boss to let me work from home a lot more, and seeing if I have the self-discipline to work for myself (sort of)!

Look forward to chatting with you guys and hearing about the benefits - and pitfalls - of freelancing.

Regards,

B
 
C

chrismitchell

Guest
#2
welcome to the forum Bethune, I would advise you against going freelance until this "recession" is over.. as the regular pay cheque is very handy :)

I used to freelance and work from home alot and it can be very lucrative if you have the self-discipline and the right clients :)
 
#3
i agree, everyone is holding their wallets a lot closer to their chests, as am i in this recession business.

Could you not start building a client base at night/weekends while hanging on to that monthly paycheck?

Go to a few networking events after work, i use Meetup.com to find new interesting people to talk to.

Hand out and receive business cards by the dozen at these kind of places.

Where do you guys find new clients other than word of mouth or cold calling?
 

Bethune

Junior Member
#4
Thanks for the very sensible advice...

This backs up what I imagined was the situation at the moment, and why I want to look into staying with a studio but talking my boss into letting me work from home more.

I am going to start a thread about 'working from home' - and hopefully this will kick off a lively conversation about 'how to' organize yourself.

Cheers for the welcome! :)

Look forward to talking to you in more length...

B
 

scotty

Moderator
Staff member
#6
I started by taking the odd job on and working at evenings and weekends.
It's okay for a while but when you roll in from work, eat and then start work 'till the early hours only to repeat the
next day it soon catches up on you.

If you can work from home or even reduce your hours at work then I'd recommend that to take some of the fear
from the leap. Try to get a few quid in the bank to take the stress out of the lean times.

I honestly can't imagine working for the man these days and doing the whole 9-5 thing. I'd die of boredom and
as for taking shit from some boss. Pffff

Good luck with it:)
 

berry

Active Member
#7
Freelance is a great if you have the discipline and stomach for it, and circumstance dictates action.

But as Chris says, nothing beats a regular paycheck. There's a time to take risks and the next 14 months is not the time unless you are one of the 2million unemployed - then you have nothing to lose.

If you make waves -be careful you don't drown ( BB Book of life)
 
#8
Berry said:
Freelance is a great if you have the discipline and stomach for it, and circumstance dictates action.

But as Chris says, nothing beats a regular paycheck. There's a time to take risks and the next 14 months is not the time unless you are one of the 2million unemployed - then you have nothing to lose.

If you make waves -be careful you don't drown ( BB Book of life)
lol where do you get this stuff from its golden.
 
#12
I just quit my day job March 1, and its been the best thing that ever happened to me! I have more work than I have time for. Agreed its tough in the beginning because you will be waiting for those first invoices to come in... I also specialize in web design and development, so thats a huge asset right now.
But regarding the recession- this is the perfect time for freelancers. More people than ever before are going to depend on affordable freelance as opposed to agencies. Small studios and freelancers will thrive right now.
As an interim step, i convinced my boss to let me work 4 days a week, and i did for about 6 months, until i knew i was ready to do it on my own. Everyone will go at his/her own pace. Just have a few months salary saved up, and make sure you have some steady freelance clients/income beforehand!