Feedback for pasta brand


Levi

Moderator
Staff member
What does it sell.... where is the 'image' or item it's trying to sell. A quick glance of that box and it could be italian dog food for all I know...
 

Wardy

Well-Known Member
It's very weak, even if you're trying for a premium, minimalist feel. There's no product for a start.
I think you need to do a bit of packaging research - just Google 'traditional pasta packaging' and there's
lots of nice design ideas for inspiration.
 

fisicx

Active Member
So Nonna's Kitchen is in the Heartland of Italy. Google doesn't really help me with this so I'm left guessing as to the location of the business.

And your pasta appears to be in a box. Go to any supermarket and Penne is almost always sold in bags. It's cheaper, lighter and far easier to fill with product. And the advantage of a bag is you can see the product.

PS: Penne takes at least 10 minutes to cook not 5.
 
So Nonna's Kitchen is in the Heartland of Italy. Google doesn't really help me with this so I'm left guessing as to the location of the business.

And your pasta appears to be in a box. Go to any supermarket and Penne is almost always sold in bags. It's cheaper, lighter and far easier to fill with product. And the advantage of a bag is you can see the product.

PS: Penne takes at least 10 minutes to cook not 5.
Here in the US it comes in boxes. $1 for 1lb.
 

bonsdes

Member
I like the background graphics/text/texture especially on the side panel. The front face is a little bit too scrappy and apart from the name panel lacks focus....and unfortunately the name panel looks like a piece of paper just stuck on. The brand marque also feels a bit old fashioned style-wise...and not authentic/traditional. I always google/research as much as possible for pack designs to see what's out there, what works and what doesn't, what conveys the right feel for the positioning etc. Carrlucios do a nice job of creating traditional looking Italian packaging that still looks contemporary.......

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=carluccios+packaging&safe=off&rlz=1C5CHFA_enGB794GB794&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj2ta3fxOfeAhUBOsAKHVdPCwkQsAR6BAgFEAE&biw=1816&bih=1093
 

sprout

New Member
Ooo – My first ever post here…

Aside from issues of typographical hierarchy and clarity (not to mention legibility), if you are going to name it Nonnas kitchen, it NEEDS an apostrophe. It is the kitchen belonging to your grandmother, therefore possessive, so should be ‘Nonna’s Kitchen’. However, if you want it to have an authentic Italian feel, why not ‘Cucina di Nonna’. As long as it is actually authentic, of course. If it is made by a bloke called Bob in Huddersfield, then using words like authentic Italian, will work against you.

Personally, I like the idea of using a box instead of yet more plastic wrapping, but I am afraid the design is a bit weak, obvious and predictable. Think about something that makes this product different. Why should someone pick it up, over any of its more established competitors? You need to find the reason why this is better. Vacuous, stereotypical graphic language won’t do it. The product itself needs to have a uniqueness, then it is your job as a designer to communicate this uniqueness. If that uniqueness is, for example, a recipe (as the name implies) that is original and just as someone’s Nan used to make, your visual language needs to reflect this. If, it is from a specific region, then use this as your hook. Each pasta is a different shape because it holds the flavour of the ‘sugo’ in a particular way. Maybe this is an avenue to go down.

See where I am going. ALWAYS start with an idea, rather than just ‘making pretty’. Design is about communication, not embellishment. If you have an idea, a reason, you have an avenue to travel down to find a solution. You may get to the end and find it was the wrong way, so change direction, but at least the solution will have substance.

Hope this helps and is not too disheartening. I always think honest criticism is more useful in the long term than feint praise.

Good luck.
 

sprout

New Member
I know you are going for an entirely different approach, but I just came across this as a nice example of idea-led packaging. Whether you like it or not, this would definitely make you notice the product, over and above the noise of market-leading competitor brands. A simple, slightly disruptive idea, that makes you smile. That’s half your marketing job done for you right away. The only danger with this, is it risks flipping from tongue-in-cheek cleverly humourous to being gimmicky, but I think, on balance, they have pulled it off really quite nicely … A cut above.
 
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