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Corel Draw Vs Photoshop...but can they be compared??

Discussion in 'Adobe Forum:' started by BDCLouise, Sep 24, 2010.

  1. BDCLouise

    BDCLouise Member

    Hi everyone, I found this article online when trying to suss out the difference between Corel Draw and Photoshop. I currently use Photoshop but am contemplating getting a new design software; anyone have any advice? I know they have huge differences- Adobe Photoshop is for image editing and Corel Draw is vector drawing but which one is better? Help please!

    “At one time, if you were serious at design then you'll have used Corel. Now in its 20th year, it's a leading application that has recently been superseded by the likes of Adobe's Illustrator package. X3 hopes to re-address this balance by introducing new features and streamlining the whole process. While Adobe is aimed at professionals, Corel has aimed for the semi-professional and the enthusiast market.

    Loading the suite up you'll find that it still maintains its clean and easy to navigate interface. Comprising three separate standalone applications: CorelDraw Photo-Shop and Capture, it's as comprehensive as you need. That said, you won't find any layout tools, nor any applications specifically aimed at web design and remains an art-based package.

    CorelDraw X3 is the heart of the package and remains a powerful tool and comes with newly designed controls that make creating images easier. PowerTrace is a re-invented tool that once stood alone but has been built into CorelDraw and is a bitmap-to-vector conversion tool. You can choose to do a quick scan for low accuracy conversions, ideal for getting an idea across. Or, more likely, you can convert high-res scans quickly and easily, as the application even allows you to specify and check the colour conversion before it does so, which can save considerable time later on.

    It's not just images manipulation that has been improved as you'll find that TEXT has been overhauled, allowing for sentence and paragraph formatting - a feature that until now hasn't been supported. What's more, formatting also expands to allow bullet-points and tabbing. True, these features could be found in the previous Format Text feature but now they sit more naturally within the main application making it easier to edit text in real time.

    Photo-Paint X3, as does Draw, is based around easy to access controls, called "dockers", which are lined on the side of the page for easy access to everything from colour palettes to Hints and Help tutorials. Image correction has been brought together in the Adjustments Lab, while the new Cutout Lab means you can remove details from images far more easily than in previous versions. Sadly, we feel the changes, while worthwhile, haven't gone far enough and still lag behind other applications on the market. Finally, Capture is a screen capture application that works well but doesn't boast too many tools.

    When it comes to resources, you can't fault the wealth or quality of the included images and clipart. Even the most idea-bereft user can find inspiration here.”
     
  2. SparkCreative

    SparkCreative Member


    Nope. I've been around since before Macs, and at no time has Corel ever been industry standard. Freehand, Pagemaker, and then Quark. Before that, Letraset.
     
  3. pcbranding

    pcbranding Member

    You can't compare a pixel-based editing application to a vector one. I know there are overlaps, but the comparison should really by Corel Draw vs. Illustrator or Corel suite vs. Creative Studio.

    I'm with you Spark...remember Letrastudio, Intellidraw and of course Macpaint?!

    What serious designer uses clip art?!

    :)
     
  4. SparkCreative

    SparkCreative Member

    Letrastudio! I loved that app. It took Freehand and Illustrator about 5 years to catch up and incorporate envelope warping anywhere near as good.
     
  5. linziloop

    linziloop Member

    I'm with the others, corel has never been industry standard, I've never even entertained the idea f using it. Adobe all the way, as much as i hate that they pretty much have the monopoly, they do have the best stuff that works well together!
     
  6. Esh

    Esh Member

    Time for me to ramble on again!:icon_smile:

    I've been trained on Adobes Illustrator/Indesign/Photoshop, but have been looking into other alternative design software, mainly due to Adobes cost.

    I've messed with Inkscape/Gimp - fairly easy to use but not very good for output, espesh Inkscape and colour etc.

    I downloaded the trial of Corel Graphics Suite X5, and was pleasantly surprised. I would say CorelDraw was almost level with Illustrator, depending on the task at hand, though I found it more 'sluggish'. Photoshop however, its zillions of years ahead of Corels PhotoPaint.

    Over the last few weeks I've done a lot of projects using the below:

    I tried Xara Designer Pro 6. Amazing software for the cost. Lightening fast. Vector, image editing, page layout, basic web design, and supported all files perfectly well. I would say it's an extremely good alternative for a solo designer with very small budget.

    As far as alternatives go however, my biggest praise goes to Serif! DrawPlus, PhotoPlus, PagePlus WebPlus. All extremely well priced, easy to use, supported all files needed. Colour management, integrated well with eachother, able to make flash animations etc etc and so on and so on. I also had no problems in getting items printed. In fact, I like it so much that I've decided to purchase! No-one could tell what software I used. I do know though, that once I have enough, I'll be getting hold of a newer version of Photoshop, as that's the one program that would be really hard to live without.

    I do think though, that if one wants to work solo, they should defo explore the alternatives as there are some good deals out there. Its only a shame that trial periods have to come to an end!
     

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