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Annoying client

Discussion in 'Website Design Forum:' started by agava, Jan 23, 2012.

  1. agava

    agava Junior Member

    Hi,
    I am not a pro, but I enjoy designing websites, poster and logos from time to time (more for pleasure than money). Lately, I have experienced a very uncomfortable situation, about which I would like to ask you for advice. I voluntarily prepared a poster for my friend's company. He did not like some details and I introduced some reasonable changes according to his wish (he expects things which are simply unrealistic to achieve or ruin the design). He started to ask me to change more and more and redesign the poster according to his (questionable) tastes. Finally, I decided to sent him the source files and told him that I give this project to him (he can ask his company's graphic designer for help) and I do not want my name on it -- they can do whatever they want with the idea and the source files. I explained that I sometimes work as a graphic designer and do not want my name on something I find ugly and unprofessional (even as for me). Now he keeps pestering me to agree to continue to change the poster according to his wish and remain the author.
    What should I do in this situation? Am I right that I do not want to author the design I do not like, or is it normal that you have to introduce any changes your client expects and I simply overacted?

    Best, M

    Opss, I don't know how it happened, but I posted this in a completely different forum than I intended. Very sorry for this.
     
  2. Levi

    Levi Moderator Staff Member

    LOL - if you're getting paid do as they want... at the end of the day the client is the one that gets the final say, we can only suggest the better option

    If it was for free... no wonder they're coming back wanting you to do it....
     
  3. BenJonesDesign

    BenJonesDesign Active Member

    exactly as Levi said. What the customer wants the customer gets, as long as they are paying of course! Many designers have the idea that they dont want their name against something they dislike but at the end of the day we all have bad clients and end up producing work we are not proud of, but it's all part of the job. Also you dont need to put it in your own portfolio so whats to worry about?
     
  4. JamesBrentwood

    JamesBrentwood Senior Member

    Like they've said above.

    It sounds like you we're not getting paid, in which case I think your decision was very respectable, and you should stand by it!
     
  5. Squiddy

    Squiddy Guest

    I would personally inform this person that whilst I was happy to help him, I didn't have the time to keep making so many revisions and that if he wants to continue working with me then he will have to start paying an hourly rate.

    This job isn't that important to you so you don't need to worry about whether or not he accepts your offer, if he does then you've got some easy money! He probably doesn't have an in-house graphic designer, which is why he wants to continue working with you. The only other reason I can imagine is that their in-house designer isn't actually in-house but contracted to work for them on certain tasks, which means they have to pay money for any work he does. I can't imagine why they would hire a full/part time designer and not utilise them to be honest.
     
  6. balders

    balders Member

    I apologize for the bad language and if you have seen it already but it makes me laugh.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfprIxNfCjk&sns=em"]Graphic Designer vs client - YouTube[/ame]
     
  7. Squiddy

    Squiddy Guest

    Mhmm, there are better ones out there that actually show you how to deal with those situations professionally. I don't really see repetitive swearing as comedy, not any more.
     
  8. agava

    agava Junior Member

    Many thanks for your advice, guys!
    I did as you suggested: I told my "client" that by agreeing to help him I didn't mean becoming his slave for a lifetime. I will provide him with the final version of the poster soon, and will not accept any further revisions (at some point he was showing my project to his friends and colleagues, and asking me to introduce or try out every suggestion they made!). I added that they can introduce changes the project, but this will automatically exclude my name from it (not very professional, I know, but since I'm not being paid). I have no idea why he wants my name on it so much! -- maybe it's just as unreasonable as my emotional attachment to my "design", which made me add this reservation.
    To my surprise, he's just answered with apologies and admitting that he exaggerated.

    Creating this poster requires some specific knowledge of the industry me and my colleague work in. His company has access to a professional designer (a contract one, as you guessed correctly), but he would have to spend genuine time explaining all the stuff to that guy. So, officially, my colleague didn't like the designer's portfolio, while the truth I suspect is that it's much more convenient for him to push it on me. But this is fine with me, we often exchange favours -- just this time he went too far.
     
  9. Squiddy

    Squiddy Guest

    I'm glad things are improving! It's good to set the boundaries of any professional relationship so that both parties know what is and what isn't acceptable.
     
  10. glenwheeler

    glenwheeler Senior Member

    I disagree, if you get a client like hat then you have to try and educate em a bit. If they don't want to listen and be ignorant the yes take the steps and do what they want but in a professional manner.
     
  11. c5cloud

    c5cloud Junior Member

    Either you are the graphic designer or he is. If a customer is telling you what you need to put on your design then they are taking over as the designer, in which case tell them this and leave the work to them.
    They would have hired you based on your portfolio and if they dont like the result then they find another designer, but make sure you bill them for any work you have done so far.
     
  12. mcskillz

    mcskillz Member

    Seconding c5 here. There comes a point when you have to question what you've been hired for. Ultimately it's all about educating your client.
     
  13. Levi

    Levi Moderator Staff Member

    educate client versus getting paid by client..... I know which I'll pick...

    Look at it this way. You could end up spending more time trying to fight them on the design, to give you what YOU want, than it would to give them what they want.

    I'm all for telling the client a better option but sometimes it's just not worth it.
     
  14. mcskillz

    mcskillz Member

    Agreed. Sometimes it's not. Sometimes. All depends on your goals. If you want a lasting relationship with a client is it to pay the bills or do work that reflects your style and abilities. It's ok to have both!
     
  15. FormeCreative

    FormeCreative New Member

    We've had a few clients like that over the years and the problem is they become very high maintenance for very little reward. Every client needs educating to some extent, it is all part of the advisory process, but when a client isn't willing to adapt there approach and take advice it can turn into a battle.

    So the way I see it is would I rather spend time in a battle with a client or would I rather spend that time developing relationships with new clients.

    Sometimes if you don't 'fit' with a particular client it's better to move on as you are not really doing each other any favours.

    Thankfully, you can usually tell straight off if you are going to clash heads with someone..
     
  16. FormeCreative

    FormeCreative New Member

    We've had a few clients like that over the years and the problem is they become very high maintenance for very little reward. Every client needs educating to some extent, it is all part of the advisory process, but when a client isn't willing to adapt there approach and take advice it can turn into a battle.

    So the way I see it is would I rather spend time in a battle with a client or would I rather spend that time developing relationships with new clients.

    Sometimes if you don't 'fit' with a particular client it's better to move on as you are not really doing each other any favours.

    Thankfully, you can usually tell straight off if you are going to clash heads with someone..
     
  17. ganea89

    ganea89 Junior Member

    Well i had a client exactly like that :) but for a site ... the site would of be finished in like 3-5 days but because of this was finished in like 8-10 days :) the problem is that he was strict in anything possible but because i like what i do and i have lots of patience i made it without to get angry or anything like it :) and i quite like what i did and beside the cash don`t matter how much was, it was well welcome :)
    Remember the client is your boss :p and u need to do a job to his likings not as u might think that u like more :) if u are paid then u do what he needs and believe me it will not take to much to finish an product.
     
  18. Avigrafia

    Avigrafia Junior Member

    But when youre a volunteer, the client isn't your boss. Once, I proposed a logo to the leader of a gaming clan and he really liked it. He asked to make the background of his youtube channel, so I agreed. He even advertised my page on the clan's videos and mentionned my name in them. But the, he wanted a banner, a logo for himself, a few backgrounds for videos and an image for his timeline, as he kept spamming my Facebook to say I had to go faster and faster... I said "I have some clients that pay me, my job for you is free and is not a priority". I added "You have 3 choices : 1. Do it youself ; 2. Wait for a week ; 3. Pay me now. Which one do you like ?" and he didn't answer. I didn't do anything else for him after. That guy learned how to use MSPaint.
     

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